Monthly Archives: October 2012

OPEN ACCESS WEEK

Open Access Week: October 22-28

Open Access Week is a global event promoting the opportunity for academic communities to continue to share the results of their research and scholarship. It runs October 22-28, 2012.

Columbia University Libraries and the Scholarly Communication Program are pleased to host three events promoting open access and its benefits this week!

Monday October 22, 1:00 pm – Butler Library, Room 523 Your Dissertation: What You Need to Know About Copyright and Electronic Filing This event is free and open to Columbia students, faculty, and staff. Students at the Columbia Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) must file their dissertations electronically, and a copy of each dissertation will be deposited in Columbia's online repository Academic Commons. This new requirement may change the way you prepare your dissertation for filing. Learn important information about using copyrighted materials in your dissertation, and depositing your work in Academic Commons. Bring your questions! Speakers: Kenneth Crews, Columbia Copyright Advisory Office Rob Hilliker, Academic Commons Manager

Tuesday October 23, 11:00 am – Butler Library, Room 523 – Bountiful Harvest? Collection-building Opportunities With Open Access This event is free and open to the public. How is open access changing the way libraries build their collections? Has it caused greater shifts in opportunities in the sciences or humanities? What are the most pressing challenges it presents? Join Columbia’s Scholarly Communication Program for a lively debate on how librarians can support open access and use it to enrich the collections and services they offer. Panelists: Matthew Baker, Collection Services Librarian, The Burke Library at Union Theological Seminary Pamela Graham, Director of Global Studies and Director, Center for Human Rights Documentation & Research, Columbia University Libraries/Information Services Megan Wacha, Research and Instruction Librarian for Media and the Performing Arts, Barnard College

Wednesday October 24, 2:30 pm – Butler Library, Room 523 Webcast Screening: Open Access and Your Publications – What’s Copyright Got To Do With It? The screening is open to Columbia students, faculty, and staff. Join us for our webcast screening of an American Library Association (ALA) webinar with Kenneth Crews, director of Columbia's Copyright Advisory Office. For librarians, researchers and many other library users, the open access movement has enabled easy and reliable access to a wide range of new publications.  However, the success of open access hinges on the terms in the agreements between authors and publishers. The copyright language that spells out whether the public will have access to specific material might be buried in a cryptic, pro forma email attachment or even a click-through agreement. Don’t let your materials stay hidden under a rock—facilitate access by learning to be proactive with the expert advice of copyright authority Kenneth D. Crews. This is the second of a series of occasional ALA webinars called “Crews on Copyright”. (NB: These events are also listed on the Scholarly Communication Program website here, and the Open Access Week 2012 website here.)

Guastavino exhibition opens at the Boston Public Library

Seventeen drawings and numerous artifacts and photographs from the Guastavino archives in the Avery Library Drawings & Archives are on display in a new exhibition at the Boston Public Library. Titled Palaces for the People: Guastavino and America’s Great Public Spaces, the exhibition was curated by a team of scholars under the direction of Professor John Ochsendorf of MIT, author of the 2009 monograph, Guastavino Vaulting. The curatorial team included Janet Parks, Curator of Drawings and Archives, Avery Library; Professor Richard Wilson, University of Virginia; Professor Christopher Capozzola, MIT; and Chrysanthe B. Broikos, curator, the National Building Museum, Washington, D.C..

The exhibition will remain at the Boston Public Library until February 24th and then travel to the National Building Museum. A New York venue is being planned. The National Endowment for the Humanities sponsored the development and execution of the exhibition, from a Consultation Grant in 2006 to the implementation grant for the exhibition in 2011 as part of the “We the People” program. Additional funding came from the Institut Ramon Llull and the Diputació de Barcelona.

Avery on Exhibit: Guastavino:
http://library.columbia.edu/content/libraryweb/indiv/avery/AveryonExhibit.html