Category Archives: Blogs & Resources

Master’s Project/Thesis Resources

Getting started on your master's project or thesis? Here at the Journalism Library, we have lots of resources to help you get started! If you'd like to look at master's projects/theses from past students, you can access the 2010-2013 ones in Journalism. The 2009 and earlier projects/theses are located on the second floor of Lehman Library. Use our Master's Projects and Theses Index to find specific titles or authors.

Doing some background research? Tackling an academic subject or something not adequately tracked by publicly available sources? Try searching in our library databases. For science topics, try Scopus or Web of Science; for humanities, social sciences, and general topics, try ProQuest or Academic Search Complete.

Looking for books on writing, editing, or copy-editing? We've got them, as well as online access to the AP Stylebook!

Want to save all your links, articles, and resources in one spot? Want to make formatting your citations easy? Try using Zotero!

Still not finding what you need? Email or tweet Starr, your Journalism Librarian, with any questions or to request a research appointment. I'm happy to help!

Students Reading Periodicals

Finding Building & Property Information

Lately, we've had many questions in the Journalism Library about finding building histories, owner names, code violations, market value, and similar things. Here's a round-up of the most useful tools to find that information! (Photo below is a 1902 panorama of NYC from the Library of Congress.)

Panoramaic photograph of New York City, taken in 1902.

Dept. of Buildings: BIS (Building Information System)
http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/bsqpm01.jsp

Lists actions, complaints, violations, alterations, certificates of occupancy, # buildings on lot, tax block/lot # (which you need for ACRIS, listed below), landmark status, zoning documents, etc. (Under “actions,” “NB” records are permits for new buildings.) When multiple buildings are on one lot, click on the number of buildings to access building-specific records. You can also use the BIS's "Building on my Block" to find properties in a block (or community district) that are new buildings or have had alterations. Good for getting a feel for what’s going on with property development in a given area.

Related: Building Permit Search, 1900 – 1986 (Office of Metropolitan History) http://www.metrohistory.com/searchfront.htm

Property Tax Bill & Information System (NYC Finance: Property) http://nycprop.nyc.gov/nycproperty/nynav/jsp/selectbbl.jsp

Market value history, building classification (what type of building it is), owner & billing address, tax charges, exemptions, abatements & any credits. You can find additional information (like number of stories or units, building dimensions, etc.) under Property Tax Benefit Information.

ACRIS (Automated City Register Information System; NYC Finance: Property) http://a836-acris.nyc.gov/CP/

Find mortgages, deeds, and other property documents. “Det” provides detailed information about the document (including the names and address of involved parties); “img” shows the document. Related NYC Property tools include the FY 2014 Final Assessment Roll for NYC and the Comparable Values for Condos & Coops.

NYC Housing and Vacancy Survey (Census Bureau) http://www.census.gov/housing/nychvs/

Includes information on rent-vs-own status, rent-to-income ratios, estimated value, and structural conditions (such as condition of exterior or interior walls).

Housing Code Violation Data (Dept. of Housing Preservation & Development)

HPD Online (find violations by address): https://webapps.hpdnyc.org/HPDonline/provide_address.aspx

New Residential Construction: http://www.census.gov/construction/nrc/

Reports from the U.S. Census on nation-wide permits for new residential construction.

U.S. Housing Market Conditions (HUD, U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development): http://www.huduser.org/portal/ushmc/home.html

Housing market data and analysis, home affordability, and related information. Available at the national, regional, metro, and local levels (some NYC-area data).

Landmark Designation Reports (only recent designations are here): http://www.nyc.gov/html/lpc/html/forms/reports.shtml

Landmark Designations, 1965 to present. (For older reports, contact the Landmark Commission directly.)

NYC Rent Guidelines Board Reports:
http://www.housingnyc.com/html/research/cresearch.html

Reports on housing supply, income & affordability, changes to rent stabilized housing stock, and more.

American FactFinder (Census Bureau): http://factfinder2.census.gov/

Two particularly relevant tables (both available at the census tract level) are:

  • Selected Economic Characteristics (DP03)
  • Selected Housing Characteristics (DP04)

Additional Information

For more information on NYC buildings, property, and real estate, consult with librarians at Columbia's Avery Art and Architecture Library.

Avery Library Subject Guides on related topics:

CRS Reports: Valuable Sources

Looking for in-depth, expert research on current issues? CRS Reports are a great resource! The Congressional Research Service (CRS) is an arm of the Library of Congress that exists to keep members of Congress informed about issues related to pending legislation. CRS staff are subject experts in a variety of fields and they produce nonpartisan reports that relate these issues in an easily-digestible format.  

CRS Reports can be hard to find. The federal government doesn't currently make them widely available to the public: you must request a CRS Report by title (or report number) from a member of Congress. However, you can find CRS Reports through subscription databases (like ProQuest), for some vendors for a fee, or for free from the following collections. 

CRS Reports on many subjects:

Collections with specific topic areas:

Subscription database for CRS Reports:

Search strategy for finding other CRS Reports:

More about CRS Reports…

This presentation talks more about CRS, summarizes past legislation that attempted to make CRS Reports public, and how to write your member of congress to request a report. For more information about CRS Reports, see this OpenCongress.org page: http://bit.ly/CRSReports

Welcome, Summer MS Students!

Welcome to all summer MS students!  Here is today's library presentation – and a few other useful things:

Have questions?  Email journalism@libraries.cul.columbia.edu for more information, to ask research questions or to set up appointments for research consultations. 
 

Welcome, MAs, PhDs, China and Spencer Fellows, & Knight-Bagehots!

 pencilWelcome, Fall MAs, PhDs, China and Spencer Fellows, and Knight-Bagehots!

Who Owns the Media?

Did you know:

  • Yahoo ranks #1 for having the most unique monthly visitors – over 39 million – to their online news sites? 
  • Time Warner ranks #1 in combined magazine circulation – over 32 million?

Find these statistics and more at Who Owns the News Media from the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism, an interactive database of companies who own news properties – online, newspaper, magazine, network tv, radio, and more – in the United States. Use the site to compare the companies, explore each media sector or read profiles of individual companies.

Spotlight on the DART Center for Journalism & Trauma

DART CenterThe DART Center for Journalism & Trauma has a wonderful resource – the DART Research Database: The Definitive Bibliography of Scholarship on Journalism & Trauma – a collaborative effort by Columbia Graduate School of Journalism IT Department, the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma, and the Dart Research Lab at the University of Tulsa.

This searchable bibliography features more than 1,500 scholarly articles on all aspects of journalism and trauma, including war reporting, human rights, mass disaster, and many others.  The User Guide can help you get started, and be sure to consult the Advanced Syntax to get the best results for your search!

Newseum – Today’s Front Pages

Ever find yourself sitting down with the New York Times and wondering what’s on the front page of the Shreveport Times instead? Curious to know whether the lead story in the Washington Post today rates a mention on page one of South Jersey’s Courier-Post?

The Newseum has a great tool that allows you to view the front pages of notable newspapers all over the world. Through a special agreement with more than 800 newspapers worldwide, the Newseum displays these front pages each day on its website. Our favorite way to browse the front pages is by viewing them on a map, as seen above. Maps are available for North America, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, the Middle East, Oceania, South America and Africa. In addition to being a lot of fun to simply browse, it’s also a great tool for comparing coverage of big stories in all corners of the world.