Fall Hours

8d22997rHappy Fall! The campus is now a buzz with the underclassmen and the semester will be in full swing. The library hours will be as follows:
August 30 & 31: CLOSED
September 1: CLOSED

Starting September 2nd our Fall hours begin.

Monday-Tuesday: 1pm-8pm
Friday: 1pm-6pm
Saturday: 10am-6pm
Sunday: 2pm-8pm

Authoritative Ebola Information

Dr. Charles Armstrong, Public Health Surgeon and Specialist on virus diseases, photographed in the laboratory in D.C., 1935. From Library of Congress.

Dr. Charles Armstrong, Public Health Surgeon and Specialist on virus diseases, photographed in the laboratory in D.C., 1935. From Library of Congress. <http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/hec2013009517/>

Many thanks to the NN/LM MAR for this timely information on Ebola!

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

World Health Organization (WHO)
Gobal Alert and Response: Ebola Virus Disease

National Library of Medicine (NLM) MedlinePlus Resource Guides

NLM Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC)
Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health

U.S. Joint Commission
Recommendations for U.S. Hospitals Treating Ebola Patients

Welcome New Students! Fall Library Hours

Hello and welcome to all the new students starting this year! We are so excited to meet you all.

Starting August 4th we will begin having new hours, including Saturday hours, for your studying needs.

Monday-Thursday: 1pm-8pm
Friday: 1pm-6pm
Saturday: 10am-6pm
Sunday: CLOSED

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Student work, take a look!

Congratulations to the graduating class of 2014! We know you might not all have had the chance to see your fellow students work from the Video Storytelling class, so here is a link to a web site created by your class mates. http://who-is-y.com/ These videos are some examples of a the great work you all created while here. We know you will do so much more in the future. Congratulations again!

(note: the videos are currently locked because the students are working to see if they can be published with other sources first. So, please enjoy the site for now, we will update with a password ASAP. At least you have an idea of what you can look forward to!) 🙂

Summer Hours

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HAPPY SUMMER SESSION! Journalism Library will begin summer hours starting Tuesday, May 27th. The Library will be CLOSED Monday, May 28th.

Monday-Thursday: 1-8pm
Friday: 1-6pm
Saturday: CLOSED
Sunday: CLOSED

Intersession Hours

Congratulations on a spectacular Spring semester! Journalism Library will begin intersession hours on Friday, May 16.
Friday (May 16): 1-6pm
Saturday and Sunday (May 17 & 18): CLOSED
Monday-Friday (May 19-23): 1-6pm
Saturday and Sunday (May 24 & 25): CLOSED
Please enjoy your time off before the summer semester, and if you are graduating, CONGRATULATIONS! We wish you all the best!

Useful Google Hacks

Image by Jonathan Beard

Sure, you use Google all the time, even for your research. This doesn’t shock your librarian—actually, she uses Google for research, too. Not as an end-all, but as one more tool in the research arsenal, along with databases, the library catalog, and organizational websites.

But are you using Google to its full potential? Probably no one is—there are many features with more continually being developed. Here are a few suggestions of how to use Google to extend your research.

Two Ways to Find Books & Fulltext Articles Faster!

1: LibX Widget

You can save yourself some time and frustration by installing the Columbia Library LibX Widget. This is a browser plug-in for either Firefox or Chrome, which automatically links to CU's library resources from ISBNs, DOIs, and more. For instance, when you’re using Amazon, LibX will tell you if Columbia owns that book. When you find an article in Google that costs money to view, right-click and select "Reload page via Columbia Libraries Off-Campus Proxy" to see if that article is accessible through Columbia. LibX also adds a button to your browser for instant library searching, so you don’t have to remember or navigate to the library website.  

2: Full-Text Articles from Google Scholar

You can configure Google Scholar so that it auto-links to full-text articles at Columbia.

  • To configure this, go to Google Scholar and click on the gear icon for "Settings."
  • In the "Library Links" section, search for Columbia University.
  • Click the checkbox for Columbia when it pops up.
  • Now hit "Save," and you're done!
  • Now when you search, any articles that Columbia has in full-text will have an icon on the right marked “e-Link @ Columbia." 

Alternately, you can simply use this link: http://www.columbia.edu/cgi-bin/cul/resolve?clio5119262

Expanding Your Sources with Google Scholar

Found one good article (or book), and can’t find another on that narrow topic? Or did you find the perfect article—but it’s twenty years old and way out of date? You can solve both of these with Google Scholar.

Enter the title (and author last name, if you have it) into Google Search. When the article title comes up in your results list, look near the bottom of the entry. There will blue text that reads "cited by X." Click on “cited by” to see more recent articles/books that cite the original source. Often these will in turn be “cited by” more recent and relevant works, so you can accrue a lot of titles this way.

This can also help judge of the significance and popularity of a work. For instance, if you find a book in the Columbia catalog that seems relevant, you can get a feel for how it’s viewed in its research field by looking up its number of citations in Google Scholar (you can also do this with Scopus or Web of Science). A word of caution, though: some works may be cited often because they’re badly reviewed, or a quality work with few citations may be too new to have been widely read. So it’s best not to use this as your only judge of worth.   

Advanced Google Search Tips

To reveal every spot in a Google Maps area for which Google has information, type: *
 
Intext: words must appear in the website; quotes make the words appear in that order. Similar search strategies include inurl (text must appear in URL) or intitle (text must be in the website’s title).
  • intext:“Supreme Court” intext:“campaign finance law”
Ways to use “OR” to expand your search:
  • “Smith denied” OR “Smith claimed” OR “Smith argued” 
  • “Manuel Isquierdo” lien OR liens 
  • Jessica + Williams|Wiliams|William
Use the minus sign to exclude words.
  • government shutdown -congress
Use the tilde to find synonyms.
  • ~car  (Searches for “car” and synonyms of “car” like automobile, vehicle.)
Search for names that may also use a middle initial or additional name with “around.”
  • Hillary AROUND(2) Clinton
  • (Shows all pages that have the name “Hillary” within two words of “Clinton.”)
Wildcard search (*) plus a phrase search (“”) allows you to find quotes where you’re missing a word.
  • "a * saved is a * earned"
Search within a specific website with “site.”
  • site:http://www.nyc.gov/ city of neighborhoods
Limit your search to a date range.
  • nyc unemployment rate daterange:201309
  • (September 2013)
Limit your search to files of a specific type. Can help you find spreadsheets, reports, etc.
  • filetype:xls unemployment
  • filetype:pdf homelessness nyc

Your Alumni Library Resources

Now that graduation is around the corner (hurray!), you may be wondering about your future access to library resources. Here's a summary of what you'll be able to use as an alum!

Moving away? Get to know your local public librarians! They will be invaluable sources for you, particularly when figuring out how to find data and information in a new city. You can find listings of local public libraries through LibWeb or IMLS. Don't forget, even if you live far away, you can reach CU Libraries through online chat, or contact us at the J-Library with the email and phone info below. 

Need government information? Find your closest U.S. federal depository library.

Finally, remember that you can always contact your friendly Journalism Librarian, Starr!

  • journalism@library.columbia.edu
  • (212) 854-0390