Rigoletto! and more…

The recent, Las Vegas-themed production of Verdi’s “Rigoletto” is included on Met Opera on Demand, available through the Libraries under “Databases“. (I’m looking at you, Music Humanities students !) … but, any opera lover will find plenty of interest on the site, including several other productions of Rigoletto, and over 450 Met opera productions, in streaming video. Check it out!

Research Help is Available!

Got questions? Need help finding resources for your final projects and papers? We’re here to help!

Here are some ways to get in touch with questions:

- ask for a librarian at the circulation desk in the Music & Arts Library, 701 Dodge;

- schedule a time with us to sit down for an in-depth review of any resources, tools, or topics;

- email us at musiclibrary@columbia.edu with questions, or to schedule a consultation with us;

- use the online reference chat service, available under “Ask a Librarian”, at this link;

A guide to some basic resources for music research and our library services is also available (as a PDF) at this link (http://bit.ly/MusicRefGuide).

We’re happy to help you move forward with your end-of-semester work. Don’t hesitate to contact us!

Jazz Dreams II: Free Film Screening, Mon. Nov. 11, 2013, at 8pm

Jazz Dreams II: A Film Screening
A Conversation with filmmaker Geoffrey Poister and musician Courtney Bryan

Columbia composer Courtney Bryan (above, center) is among 3 young musicians from New Orleans who are featured in a new documentary film, presented by Columbia’s Center for Jazz Studies. The film

“follows three young jazz musicians from New Orleans as they embark on difficult careers. Beginning with their high school years, it follows them through the death and destruction of Hurricane Katrina, to their becoming parents and entrepreneurs. The film features Jason Marsalis, the youngest Marsalis; Irvin Mayfield, a Grammy Award winning trumpet player/composer, and pianist and composer Courtney Bryan. These committed young black Americans show their determination to keep America’s most original art form alive and vibrant. Wynton Marsalis, Ellis Marsalis, and Gordon Parks all appear.”

Location:
Monday November 11, 2013, 8 p.m. 101 Prentis Hall, 632 West 125th Street (Between Broadway and Riverside Drive)

Event Cost:
Free and open to the public but rsvp is required by emailing ym189@columbia.edu or calling 212-851-9270

Directions to Prentis Hall can be seen at this link.

 

India Music Week exhibition

   

In conjunction with India Music Week, the Music & Arts Library has mounted an exhibition of materials from our collections representing the music of India, including books and recordings in several formats, and covering musical styles from the ancient art music traditions through Bollywood film music.  As is the case in several other areas of the world, audio cassettes were (and may remain) an important format for distribution, and our collections include over 800 audio cassettes of Indian music in many styles. The exhibition will remain up for several weeks; stop by and have a look, and perhaps enjoy listening to some of the many selections which are available in our collections for check-out. And, if you’re in the mood to enjoy some music of India remotely, check out the streaming audio content available on the Contemporary World Music and Smithsonian Global databases. Enjoy!

 

EVENT: NY Philharmonic Digital Archives, Mon 10/28/13, 1-2:30pm

The New York Philharmonic Digital Archives: Fair Use online and New Sources for Digital Humanities
Monday, October 28, 1-2:30pm
203 Butler Library, Columbia University

(example: 1st violin part from Mahler’s Symphony no. 4; score marked up by Leonard Bernstein)

Since 1842, the New York Philharmonic has preserved nearly every document or scrap of paper relevant to its concert
and business activities creating one of the world’s largest collections of a single, continuously operating
performing arts institution. The material includes conductor and artist correspondence, marked scores and parts,
meeting minutes, contracts, subscriber lists, musician attendance sheets, press clippings, personnel and donor
records, printed programs, etc. In 2009, with a generous grant from the Leon Levy Foundation, the Archives began
digitizing all paper (1.3 million pages) between 1943 and 1970 making it freely available on the internet.

Two goals of the digitization were that new connections would be made within the collections and new forms of
research would result.  Legal obligations and ways to meet these requirements which had not been relevant to a
reading-room research had to be worked out. Subscriber records, a record type that had never been used by scholars,
became the focus for a new study on New York elites.

Barbara Haws is the Philharmonic’s Archivist and Historian leading the digital project.  Jane Ginsburg, the Morton
L. Janklow Professor of Literary and Artistic Property Law at the Columbia Law School advises the Philharmonic
Digital Archives on intellectual property issues including fair use. Shamus Khan, Associate Professor of Sociology
at Columbia leads a team of sociologists in a digital humanities project funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
to study New York elites using the New York Philharmonic’s subscriber and concert hall seating records.

Directions to Butler Library are here:
http://library.columbia.edu/locations/butler/directions.html
===================================================================

Reminder: Reference Help is Available!

Got questions? Need help finding resources for your final projects and papers? We’re here to help!

Here are some ways to get in touch with questions:

- ask for a librarian at the circulation desk in 701 Dodge;

- schedule a time with us to sit down for an in-depth review of resources, tools, or topics;

- email us at musiclibrary@columbia.edu with questions, or to schedule a consultation with us;

- use the online reference chat service, available under “Ask a Librarian”, at this link;

A guide to some basic resources for music research and our library services is also available (as a PDF) at this link (http://bit.ly/MusicRefGuide).

We’re happy to help you move forward with your end-of-semester work. Don’t hesitate to contact us!

Resounding Images: Medieval Intersections of Art, Music, and Sound – May 3, 9am-6pm

The Dept. of Music co-sponsors this interesting interdisciplinary event, on Friday, May 3, from 9am-6pm, as part of the University Seminar on Medieval Studies. Prof. Susan Boynton, from the Music Dept. faculty, will present opening remarks.

From the event page:

“Although sound is probably the most difficult component of the past to reconstruct, it was also the most pervasive, whether planned or unplanned, instrumental or vocal, occasional or ambient. This conference brings together specialists in several fields to explore the now-missing intersection of visual and aural in the experience of medieval environments and objects.”

Distinguished speakers from several institutions will present a fascinating and varied program. Full details are available at this link (note that registration is required for the conference, although it is free).

There will be an associated concert by members of Columbia’s Collegium Musicum, and others, of Byzantine and Latin chant, performed in the Burke Library, on Saturday, May 4, at 3pm. Details on the concert can be found here.

Both the conference and the concert are free and open to the public.

Wed 4/10: Mark Everist: ´Cantum pulcriorem invenire´: Medieval Latin Poetry and Music

On Wednesday, April 10, from 5:30-7pm, Professor Mark Everist, University of Southampton, presents a talk titled “´Cantum pulcriorem invenire´: Medieval Latin Poetry and Music“, at Columbia’s Faculty House. From the event description:

    “The long thirteenth century (c1170 to c1320) saw the emergence of three coherent repertories of polyphonic music: settings of liturgical chant called organum, motets that were originally derived from parts of organum and the conductus. Organum and the motet have been the subject of impressive levels of musicological study in the last 150 years whereas the conductus-despite its status as the first consistent repertory of newly-composed polyphony-has remained somewhat in the shadows. Although the repertory has been catalogued, little work, admittedly very distinguished, has been built on these bibliographical foundations. The conductus therefore stands at the centre of this project, merging Latin poetry and music in a single genre.”

The  event is free and open to the public. There will be a post-talk dinner, but note that this requires an RSVP and a fee of $25. Full details of the program are available at this link.

Computer Music Center presents workshop on composition/production (free!)

Columbia’s Computer Music Center presents a FREE all-day workshop on composition and production, on Sunday 4/14/13, 10am-5pm, at the Center, Prentis Hall, 3rd floor, 632 W. 125th St. The event will feature several noted composers and music coders and technologists.

From their announcement:

The Columbia University Computer Music Center is hosting a day-long workshop on issues arising from ‘production’: the impact of contemporary recording studio and digital-signal processing tools in crafting the sonic presentation of music. We will be especially focussing on the use of these tools, how they influence our musical creativity and the role recording technologies play in shaping the work we do. Towards that end, we have invited a group of musicians and researchers involved in music technology to help lead a community discussion of these issues. All are welcome to participate in this event.

The event is free and open to the public. Full details are at this link.  Come on down!

Digital Music Lab – upcoming info sessions announced for 3/29, 4/5 and 4/12, 2-3pm

Announcing three upcoming info sessions on the resources of the Digital Music Lab, in the Music & Arts Library.

The Digital Music Lab offers specialized music software, digital pianos, and a large-format scanner. The software enables you to compose, edit, notate, process, transcribe, and analyze digital audio and music notation.

Applications include Sibelius, Finale, Logic Pro, Abelton Live, Max/MSP, Audacity, Amadeus Pro, and more.

The info sessions will provide an overview of the software and some examples of projects that can be done using these tools, as well as information on further resources and tutorials for learning more.

You can sign up for a session at this link: http://bit.ly/MusicLabDemos

If the dates above don’t work for you, and you’d like to be notified of future sessions, you can also indicate that using the form at the link above.

Hope to see you in the Lab!