Luisa Passerini, Living Archives: Continuity and Innovation in the Art of Memory, 4/1 at 6PM


Living Archives:
Continuity and Innovation in the Art of Memory

WHO: Luisa Passerini is Part-time Professor at the European University Institute, Florence, Italy; Visiting Professor at Columbia University, NY, NY; former Professor of Cultural History from the University of Turin, Italy; and Principal Investigator of the European Research Council Project “Bodies Across Borders. Oral and Visual Memory in Europe and Beyond.” Among her recent books: Women and Men in Love. European Identities in the Twentieth Century (2012); Sogno di Europa (2009); Memory and Utopia. The primacy of Intersubjectivity (2007); Europe in Love, Love in Europe (1999); Autobiography of a Generation. Italy 1968, (1996); Fascism in Popular Memory (1987).


WHEN: Tuesday, April 1, 2014, 6:00-8:00pm.

WHERE: Columbia University, Knox Hall, Room 509, 550 West 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

The term “living archives” was at the center of a debate on the purpose and method of oral history in the 1970s, concerning particularly the nature of the interview and the relationship between the past and the present. The first part of the talk will deal with the implications of this debate and with the
changes in the meaning of “living archives” that took place in the following decades until the present, especially in the light of the history of the
senses. A second part of the talk will focus on the complementary nature of oral and visual memory, including notes from the fieldwork of the ongoing
research project directed by the speaker, “Bodies Across Borders. Oral and Visual Memory in Europe and Beyond” (sponsored by the European Research Council). Examples of forms of visual memory will be shown and commented, within the framework of the concept of intersubjectivity understood as
intercorporeality.

SPONSORS: This talk is part of the “Paul F. Lazarsfeld Lecture Series,” co-sponsored by the Columbia Center for Oral History Research (CCOHR) and the  Oral History Master of Arts Program (OHMA). Support from the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) is provided for programming that embodies late Professor Paul Lazarsfeld’s commitment to improving methodological approaches that address concerns of vital cultural and social significance.

INFORMATION: For more information, please email Terrell Frazier at terrellfrazier@columbia.edu

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

NO REGISTRATION REQUIRED

APPLY: 2014 Summer Institute, Second Generation Memories and Stories

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE AND APPLY

The Center for Oral History Research and INCITE (Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics) are pleased to announce our 2014 Summer Institute, “Second Generation Memories and Stories,” to be held June 16-27, 2014 at Columbia University in New York City. The program will explore the ways in which memories are formed and transmitted through family, cultural, political and social frames and experiences. Oral history has been a central methodology in exploring global themes of identity and post-memory through second-generation stories of immigration, migration, poverty, trauma and genocide, displacement and exile. Oral history also provides a setting for intimate exchanges between families, communities and cultures in a way that preserves and secures local and indigenous knowledge across generations, cultures and ethnicities: engendering individual and social resilience.

We encourage applicants to use the Institute to explore a broad range of applications of second-generation oral history research in contemporary contexts and fields including public health and medicine, immigration studies (including the impact of post-9/11 US policies on immigrant communities), sociology and social science more generally. The program will include presentations on how scholars, museums and memorials have used second-generation oral histories, and testimony, in ways that are crucial to illuminating forgotten or misunderstood experiences. The Institute will also include practical workshops in digital storytelling, interviewing and editing.

Core faculty will include:• Mary Marshall Clark, Director of the Columbia Center for Oral History Research and co-director of the Oral History Master of Arts Program at the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics of Columbia University;

Peter Bearman, Director of the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics and co-director of the Oral History Master of Arts Program;

Doug Boyd, Director of the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries;

Alessandro Portelli, Professor of Anglo-American Literature at the University of Rome-La Sapienza;

Amy Starecheski, Associate Director of the Oral History Master of Arts Program at the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics of Columbia University;

Ronald J. Grele, Director Emeritus of the Columbia Center for Oral History;

Linda Shopes, Former President of the U.S. Oral History Association, Freelance Editor and Consultant in Oral and Public History.

• CCOHR staff, students from the Oral History Master of Arts Program (OHMA), and others who have worked in the archive will enrich our discussions with their interpretations.

Low-cost on-campus housing will be available for those outside of the New York City area.

Please contact Terrell Frazier with any questions.

http://incite.columbia.edu/summer-institute-ccohr/

CCOHR Joins Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) in New Partnership

In a pathbreaking move that has strengthened the Columbia Center for Oral History (CCOH), the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) has partnered with the Columbia University Libraries in managing and administering the activities and programs of the CCOH. INCITE and its founder Peter Bearman (Sociology) have worked closely with the staff of CCOH over the years, particularly in the development of the September 11, 2001 Oral History Projects and the Oral History Master of Arts program.

Under the terms of the new partnership, INCITE will have responsibility for the research, education, and outreach activities of CCOH. These include new oral history projects, the Oral History Master of Arts program (which was already jointly administered by CCOH and INCITE), the Summer Institute, and public programming. All of these activities will take shape under the CCOHR. The R stands for Research. The Libraries, in turn, will focus its energies on the curatorial and archiving aspects of CCOH’s mission. The Libraries will devote more staff and attention to acquiring, processing, and making more generally available the rich set of resources that comprise the CCOH archive. All of these activities will take shape under the CCOHA, the A stands for Archives. This new relationship thus anchors CCOH firmly in faculty research and teaching, while bolstering Columbia University Libraries commitments to professional archival management through the Rare Book & Manuscript Library (RBML).

This semester, Mary Marshall Clark, director of CCOHR, along with program coordinators David Briand and Sarah Dziedzic, all officially joined the INCITE team. The CCOHR will carry out a full portfolio of new and important oral history projects. CCOHA will continue to provide reference and support services under the management of the RBML. Research activities will take place at INCITE’s research space at 122nd and Broadway.

Click here to learn more about CCOHR.

The Interdisciplinary Center Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) cultivates public intelligence concerning socially and culturally vital ideas that can be advanced by research, education and conversation at the interdisciplinary seams that the social sciences share with one another, the humanities, the life and behavioral sciences: incite.columbia.edu.

The Columbia Center for Oral History Research‘s mission is to record unique life histories, document the central historical events and memories of our times, and to teach and do research across the disciplines: http://incite.columbia.edu/ccohr/

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 11 million volumes, over 150,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers. The Libraries employs more than 500 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

 

Fall 2013 Oral History Workshop Series

Fall 2013 Oral History Workshop Series

This series is co-sponsored by the Columbia Center for Oral History (CCOH) and the Oral History Master of Arts Program (OHMA). All of our workshops are free and open to the public and will explore the myriad of ethical and practical issues raised by the practice of oral history in the different disciplines within the humanities and social sciences.

All of the events in the Oral History Workshop are funded through the Paul F. Lazarsfeld Lecture Series, which provides support for events that honor the legacy of the former Columbia professor.

September

Darija Marić “Personal Memories of war and Detention in Croatia from 1941 until Today: Making Private Experiences Public as a Means of Mobilizing Support and Developing Understanding

Thursday, September 12, 6:30-8:30pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map. [More Information]

Co-sponsored by the Institute for the Study of Human Rights

Daniel Wolff “Listening to New Orleans

Thursday, September 26, 6:30-8:30pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

October

Avner GvaryahuOur Harsh Logic: Israeli Soldiers’ Testimonies from the Occupied Territories 2000-2010

Monday, October 7, 6:30-8:30pm, 523 Butler Library, 535 West 114th Street, 5th floor. Campus Map. [Flyer]

Co-sponsored by The Middle East Institute

Muriel MiguelFrom Storytelling to Storyweaving: Muriel Miguel, A Retrospective

Thursday, October 24, 6:30-8:30pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

November

Audrey Petty (Voice of Witness) “High Rise Stories” 

Thursday, November 7, 6:30-8:30pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

Jeff Friedman “The Eros of Oral History” 

Thursday, November 21, 6:30-8:30pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

All events are free and open to the public

Please refer to oralhistory.columbia.edu for updated information

 

Upcoming Workshop: Personal Memories of War and Detention in Croatia from 1941 until Today, 9/12 at 6:30PM

The Oral History Master of Arts (OHMA) Program, Columbia Center for Oral History and the Institute for the Study of Human Rights Presents:

Personal Memories of war and Detention in Croatia from 1941 until Today: Making Private Experiences Public as a Means of Mobilizing Support and Developing Understanding

WHO: Darija Marić is a sociologist who has been working at Documenta – Center for Dealing with the Past since 2009. Currently she is coordinating field research for the project “Unveiling Personal Memories on War and Detention from 1941 until today.” The project includes thecreation of a collection of 400 video-recorded testimonies on a wide range of war experiences in Croatia with the use of oral history as a method to collect and open up individual memories on past traumatic events from a wide range of perspectives, including those of minorities, victims, women, war veterans, etc. Prior to this, Ms. Marić worked in Documenta as a coordinator of consultative process in Croatia of Initiative for RECOM, the Regional Commission Tasked with Establishing the Facts about All Victims of War Crimes and Other Serious Human Rights Violations Committed on the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia from 1991-2001. She is currently a fellow in the Columbia University Institute for the Study of Human Rights Historical Dialogue and Accountability Fellowship Program.

WHEN: Thursday, September 12, 2013, 6:30-8:30pm.

WHERE: Columbia University, Knox Hall, Room 509, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP: This workshop will focus on the “Unveiling Personal Memories of War and Detention in Croatia from 1941 until the Present” project. The aim of the project is to affirm the personal memories of witnesses and protagonists of historical events and preserve them from permanent loss. Marić proposes that strengthening personal and social processes of dealing with the past is a necessary precondition for building sustainable peace and stability in Croatian society and developing a tradition of democratic values, especially human rights. In this talk she uses the work of Documenta, a human rights organization focused on dealing with the past, to ask if and how oral history can be used as a means of social change.

SPONSORS: This talk is part of the “Paul F. Lazarsfeld Lecture Series,” co-sponsored by the Columbia Center for Oral History (CCOH), Oral History Master of Arts Program (OHMA), and the Institute for the Study of Human Rights. Support from the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) is provided for programming that embodies late Professor Paul Lazarsfeld’s commitment to improving methodological approaches that address concerns of vital cultural and social significance.

INFORMATION: For more information, please email Terrell Frazier at terrellfrazier@columbia.edu

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Join us at Public Events for Our 2013 Summer Institute!

CCOH 2013 Summer institute
“Telling the World: Indigenous Memories, Rights, and Narratives”

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 4:00-6:00pm — “One Nurse-Midwife’s Story: Dr. Ruth Lubic in Conversation with Elizabeth Hegeman”

LOCATION: Columbia University, 203 Butler Library, Morningside Heights Campus Google Map, Campus Map

At a time when the infant mortality rate in Washington, DC was twice that of the rest of the nation, Ruth Lubic stepped in.

Join the Columbia Center for Oral History for an evening with Ruth Lubic, nurse-midwife, MacArthur Fellowship recipient, and founder of the DC Birth Center at the Developing Families Center. In conversation with Elizabeth Hageman, the evening will feature stories of her advocacy for “high-touch, low-tech” approaches to family care before and after childbirth. Lubic was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship of $375,000 over five years in 1993 for her work in New York’s South Bronx, where she opened the first state-approved center in the country, the Morris Heights Childbearing Center. Shifting her attention to Washington DC, Lubic opened the DC Birth Center in 2000 to make care available where infant mortality was disproportionately high.

Ruth Lubic co-founded the National Association of Childbearing Centers in 1983 and has helped establish more than 200 free-standing birth centers.



THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 6:00-8:00pm — “Language Revitalization: Harnessing New Technologies”

LOCATION: Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Annex, Morningside Heights Campus . Google MapCampus Map.

Globalization has been compared to colonization in terms of language dominance and subsequent homogenization. However, new technologies, a hallmark of globalization can be exploited and developed to aid in language revitalization efforts. In this presentation Drs. Tania Ka’ai and Rachel Ka’ai-Mahuta will explore some of the work conducted in Te Ipukarea: The National Māori Language Institute and the International Centre for Language Revitalisation. The presentation will feature the Reo Online Language Systems.

Dr. Ka’ai is the Director of Te Ipukarea and Te Whare Rongomaurikura and also a Professor in Māori Innovation and Development at the Auckland University of Tehnology, Aotearoa/New Zealand. Dr. Ka’ai-Mahuta is of New Zealand Māori, Native Hawaiian, Cook Island Māori, and Samoan descent. Rachael is a Senior Lecturer in Te Ara Poutama, Faculty of Māori Development, and Associate Director of Te Whare o Rongomaurikura at AUT. MORE INFO HERE



MONDAY, JUNE 17, 5:30-7:30pm — “Māori Song and Oral Tradition”

LOCATION: Columbia University, Knox Hall, Room 509 (5th Floor), 606 West 122nd Street, Morningside Heights Campus, Google Map, Campus Map

The Māori language is traditionally an exclusively oral language. Therefore, Māori knowledge, histories, and traditions have been preserved and disseminated through the oral tradition. This rich oral tradition has taken on many forms, including waiata (Māori song). In this presentation, Dr. Rachel Ka’ai-Mahuta will examine the importance of waiata and issues of preserving and disseminating waiata for future generations.



TUESDAY, JUNE 18, 3:30-5:30pm — “Oral History, Storyweaving & Documentary Theater”

LOCATION: Columbia University, 203 Butler Library, Morningside Heights Campus Google MapCampus Map

Since its founding in 1976, Spiderwoman Theatre has broken new ground in using storytelling and story weaving as the basis for the creation of their theatrical pieces.

Join Oral History Master of Arts student and stage manager Sara Sinclair for a discussion of her work alongside director Murial Miguel in the production of “Violence – The Next Generation,” a multigenerational theatre production at Spiderwoman Theatre. Weaving together stories of personal and family violence, three generations of Indigenous women relay their stories of transcending violence in their lives and communities.

Sinclair will present her work to organically layer the women’s words with movement, text, sound, music, and visual images, creating a script from the women’s stories.



THESE EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

NO REGISTRATION REQUIRED