Category Archives: OHMA

Join us for Our 2014-2015 Workshop Series: Oral History, Medicine, and Health

Fall 2014 Oral History Workshop Series: Oral History, Medicine, and Health

This academic year in our public workshop series, in partnership with the Program in Narrative Medicine, the Oral History MA Program at Columbia University will be exploring the intersections of oral history, health and medicine. As public health professionals experiment with using oral history to access new realms of knowledge about health and social life, practitioners of narrative medicine deploy oral history to engage with patients, and oral historians partner with people with disabilities, dementia, and mental illness to record and amplify their stories, the time is right for an in-depth multidisciplinary engagement of the productive areas where these fields meet.

Full schedule and descriptions

All Events are Free and Open to the Public
Campus Map.

September

Sam Robson. “Oral History Meets Dementia: A Staged Reading of the Play Timothy and Mary.”

Thursday, September 11, 6-8pm, The Faculty House at Columbia University, Seminar Room One.

Luke Gerwe. “Seeking Witness: Voice of Witness and Building an Oral History Network.”

Thursday, September 18, 6-8pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

October

Teiji Okamoto. “A Radical Archive of Be(long)ing.”

Thursday, October 2, 6-8pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

Sayantani DasGupta. “Narrative Humility: Medical Listening and Oral History.”

Thursday, October 16, 6-8pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

November

Brian Purnell. ” Can the Oral Historian Speak?

Thursday, November 6, 6-8pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

Nicki Berger. “Oral History and Intellectual Disability: Navigating Authority, Authorship, and Advocacy.

Thursday, November 13, 6-8pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

Stay posted for upcoming events in the Spring!

Feb. 5: Ann Cvetkovich. “After Depression: Reflections on Oral and Written Personal Narrative as Archive of Feelings.”

Feb. 12: Joanne Ahola. “Finding the Contours of Torture.”

Feb. 26: Christopher Sellers. “Stories of Environmental Danger: A Collective
Approach.”

Mar. 5: Kathy Davis. “Bodies, Embodiment, and the Experience of Passion: What Tango Dancers Can Teach Us.”

Mar. 12: Lynda Crane and Tracy McDonough. “Oral History with Vulnerable Populations: The Schizophrenia Oral History Project.

Mar. 26: Ron Doel. “Oral History and the History of Science and Medicine.”

Apr. 2: Alessandro Portelli. “Stories I Skipped: Narratives of Care, Narratives of War.

Apr. 16: Ynestra King. “Listening with the Whole Body in Mind Feminist Oral History Project.”

Apr. 30: Aline Gubrium and Elizabeth L. Krause.”Digital Storytelling as Narrative Shock: New Views on Young Parenting Latinas, Migration, and Family.

Please refer to oralhistory.columbia.edu for updated information, or email Amy Starecheski, Associate Director of OHMA, at aas39(at)columbia.edu.

May 1 at 5pm: Social Hall: An Oral History Exhibit

The Social Hall: an Oral History Exhibit
Produced and curated by Columbia University’s OHMA Students

Please join us to celebrate our exploration of oral history-based projects

WHEN:     Thursday, May 1, 5:00 to 8:00 p.m.

WHERE:    Social Hall
Union Theological Seminary
3041 Broadway (at 121st Street)
New York, New York 10027

ADMISSION: Free

Columbia University’s Oral History Master of Arts 2014 Cohort is proud to present “Social Hall,” an exhibition of complex projects that both challenge and advance the field of oral history. By considering multimedia applications and social presentations, we wish to introduce a new audience to the field and to share its significance in our world, both past and present.

“Social Hall” is made up of individual projects that address a wide range of topics, including Argentina’s struggle for memory in a post-dictatorship society, a woman’s journey from Fort Mojave Indian Tribe to Yale University, the explorations of a scrap diver, definition of community in Red Hook, Brooklyn, and a documentary on Black men during the era of Black Power and Black Nationalism. These projects are connected through their dependence on oral history and their engagement with living individuals, our narrators.  All projects in this exhibit were developed by OHMA students.

ABOUT OHMA

The Oral History Master of Arts is the first program of its kind: a one-yearinterdisciplinary Master of Arts degree training students in oral history method and theory.  Jointly run by the Columbia Center for Oral History Research, one of the preeminent oral history centers in the world, and INCITE, a lively hub for interdisciplinary research in the humanities and social sciences, OHMA connects students with the intellectual resources of a major research university, and with the intimate society of a small cohort of talented students.May 1 Flyer

Luisa Passerini, Living Archives: Continuity and Innovation in the Art of Memory, 4/1 at 6PM


Living Archives:
Continuity and Innovation in the Art of Memory

WHO: Luisa Passerini is Part-time Professor at the European University Institute, Florence, Italy; Visiting Professor at Columbia University, NY, NY; former Professor of Cultural History from the University of Turin, Italy; and Principal Investigator of the European Research Council Project “Bodies Across Borders. Oral and Visual Memory in Europe and Beyond.” Among her recent books: Women and Men in Love. European Identities in the Twentieth Century (2012); Sogno di Europa (2009); Memory and Utopia. The primacy of Intersubjectivity (2007); Europe in Love, Love in Europe (1999); Autobiography of a Generation. Italy 1968, (1996); Fascism in Popular Memory (1987).


WHEN: Tuesday, April 1, 2014, 6:00-8:00pm.

WHERE: Columbia University, Knox Hall, Room 509, 550 West 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

The term “living archives” was at the center of a debate on the purpose and method of oral history in the 1970s, concerning particularly the nature of the interview and the relationship between the past and the present. The first part of the talk will deal with the implications of this debate and with the
changes in the meaning of “living archives” that took place in the following decades until the present, especially in the light of the history of the
senses. A second part of the talk will focus on the complementary nature of oral and visual memory, including notes from the fieldwork of the ongoing
research project directed by the speaker, “Bodies Across Borders. Oral and Visual Memory in Europe and Beyond” (sponsored by the European Research Council). Examples of forms of visual memory will be shown and commented, within the framework of the concept of intersubjectivity understood as
intercorporeality.

SPONSORS: This talk is part of the “Paul F. Lazarsfeld Lecture Series,” co-sponsored by the Columbia Center for Oral History Research (CCOHR) and the  Oral History Master of Arts Program (OHMA). Support from the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) is provided for programming that embodies late Professor Paul Lazarsfeld’s commitment to improving methodological approaches that address concerns of vital cultural and social significance.

INFORMATION: For more information, please email Terrell Frazier at terrellfrazier@columbia.edu

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

NO REGISTRATION REQUIRED

APPLY: 2014 Summer Institute, Second Generation Memories and Stories

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE AND APPLY

The Center for Oral History Research and INCITE (Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics) are pleased to announce our 2014 Summer Institute, “Second Generation Memories and Stories,” to be held June 16-27, 2014 at Columbia University in New York City. The program will explore the ways in which memories are formed and transmitted through family, cultural, political and social frames and experiences. Oral history has been a central methodology in exploring global themes of identity and post-memory through second-generation stories of immigration, migration, poverty, trauma and genocide, displacement and exile. Oral history also provides a setting for intimate exchanges between families, communities and cultures in a way that preserves and secures local and indigenous knowledge across generations, cultures and ethnicities: engendering individual and social resilience.

We encourage applicants to use the Institute to explore a broad range of applications of second-generation oral history research in contemporary contexts and fields including public health and medicine, immigration studies (including the impact of post-9/11 US policies on immigrant communities), sociology and social science more generally. The program will include presentations on how scholars, museums and memorials have used second-generation oral histories, and testimony, in ways that are crucial to illuminating forgotten or misunderstood experiences. The Institute will also include practical workshops in digital storytelling, interviewing and editing.

Core faculty will include:• Mary Marshall Clark, Director of the Columbia Center for Oral History Research and co-director of the Oral History Master of Arts Program at the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics of Columbia University;

Peter Bearman, Director of the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics and co-director of the Oral History Master of Arts Program;

Doug Boyd, Director of the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries;

Alessandro Portelli, Professor of Anglo-American Literature at the University of Rome-La Sapienza;

Terrell Frazier, Director of Education and Outreach at the Columbia Center for Oral History;

Amy Starecheski, Associate Director of the Oral History Master of Arts Program at the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics of Columbia University;

Ronald J. Grele, Director Emeritus of the Columbia Center for Oral History;

Linda Shopes, Former President of the U.S. Oral History Association, Freelance Editor and Consultant in Oral and Public History.

• CCOHR staff, students from the Oral History Master of Arts Program (OHMA), and others who have worked in the archive will enrich our discussions with their interpretations.

Low-cost on-campus housing will be available for those outside of the New York City area.

Please contact Terrell Frazier with any questions.

http://incite.columbia.edu/summer-institute-ccohr/

Fall 2013 Oral History Workshop Series

Fall 2013 Oral History Workshop Series

This series is co-sponsored by the Columbia Center for Oral History (CCOH) and the Oral History Master of Arts Program (OHMA). All of our workshops are free and open to the public and will explore the myriad of ethical and practical issues raised by the practice of oral history in the different disciplines within the humanities and social sciences.

All of the events in the Oral History Workshop are funded through the Paul F. Lazarsfeld Lecture Series, which provides support for events that honor the legacy of the former Columbia professor.

September

Darija Marić “Personal Memories of war and Detention in Croatia from 1941 until Today: Making Private Experiences Public as a Means of Mobilizing Support and Developing Understanding

Thursday, September 12, 6:30-8:30pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map. [More Information]

Co-sponsored by the Institute for the Study of Human Rights

Daniel Wolff “Listening to New Orleans

Thursday, September 26, 6:30-8:30pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

October

Avner GvaryahuOur Harsh Logic: Israeli Soldiers’ Testimonies from the Occupied Territories 2000-2010

Monday, October 7, 6:30-8:30pm, 523 Butler Library, 535 West 114th Street, 5th floor. Campus Map. [Flyer]

Co-sponsored by The Middle East Institute

Muriel MiguelFrom Storytelling to Storyweaving: Muriel Miguel, A Retrospective

Thursday, October 24, 6:30-8:30pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

November

Audrey Petty (Voice of Witness) “High Rise Stories” 

Thursday, November 7, 6:30-8:30pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

Jeff Friedman “The Eros of Oral History” 

Thursday, November 21, 6:30-8:30pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

All events are free and open to the public

Please refer to oralhistory.columbia.edu for updated information

 

Upcoming Workshop: Personal Memories of War and Detention in Croatia from 1941 until Today, 9/12 at 6:30PM

The Oral History Master of Arts (OHMA) Program, Columbia Center for Oral History and the Institute for the Study of Human Rights Presents:

Personal Memories of war and Detention in Croatia from 1941 until Today: Making Private Experiences Public as a Means of Mobilizing Support and Developing Understanding

WHO: Darija Marić is a sociologist who has been working at Documenta – Center for Dealing with the Past since 2009. Currently she is coordinating field research for the project “Unveiling Personal Memories on War and Detention from 1941 until today.” The project includes thecreation of a collection of 400 video-recorded testimonies on a wide range of war experiences in Croatia with the use of oral history as a method to collect and open up individual memories on past traumatic events from a wide range of perspectives, including those of minorities, victims, women, war veterans, etc. Prior to this, Ms. Marić worked in Documenta as a coordinator of consultative process in Croatia of Initiative for RECOM, the Regional Commission Tasked with Establishing the Facts about All Victims of War Crimes and Other Serious Human Rights Violations Committed on the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia from 1991-2001. She is currently a fellow in the Columbia University Institute for the Study of Human Rights Historical Dialogue and Accountability Fellowship Program.

WHEN: Thursday, September 12, 2013, 6:30-8:30pm.

WHERE: Columbia University, Knox Hall, Room 509, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP: This workshop will focus on the “Unveiling Personal Memories of War and Detention in Croatia from 1941 until the Present” project. The aim of the project is to affirm the personal memories of witnesses and protagonists of historical events and preserve them from permanent loss. Marić proposes that strengthening personal and social processes of dealing with the past is a necessary precondition for building sustainable peace and stability in Croatian society and developing a tradition of democratic values, especially human rights. In this talk she uses the work of Documenta, a human rights organization focused on dealing with the past, to ask if and how oral history can be used as a means of social change.

SPONSORS: This talk is part of the “Paul F. Lazarsfeld Lecture Series,” co-sponsored by the Columbia Center for Oral History (CCOH), Oral History Master of Arts Program (OHMA), and the Institute for the Study of Human Rights. Support from the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) is provided for programming that embodies late Professor Paul Lazarsfeld’s commitment to improving methodological approaches that address concerns of vital cultural and social significance.

INFORMATION: For more information, please email Terrell Frazier at terrellfrazier@columbia.edu

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC