Category Archives: Public Lectures

Join us for Our 2014-2015 Workshop Series: Oral History, Medicine, and Health

Fall 2014 Oral History Workshop Series: Oral History, Medicine, and Health

This academic year in our public workshop series, in partnership with the Program in Narrative Medicine, the Oral History MA Program at Columbia University will be exploring the intersections of oral history, health and medicine. As public health professionals experiment with using oral history to access new realms of knowledge about health and social life, practitioners of narrative medicine deploy oral history to engage with patients, and oral historians partner with people with disabilities, dementia, and mental illness to record and amplify their stories, the time is right for an in-depth multidisciplinary engagement of the productive areas where these fields meet.

Full schedule and descriptions

All Events are Free and Open to the Public
Campus Map.

September

Sam Robson. “Oral History Meets Dementia: A Staged Reading of the Play Timothy and Mary.”

Thursday, September 11, 6-8pm, The Faculty House at Columbia University, Seminar Room One.

Luke Gerwe. “Seeking Witness: Voice of Witness and Building an Oral History Network.”

Thursday, September 18, 6-8pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

October

Teiji Okamoto. “A Radical Archive of Be(long)ing.”

Thursday, October 2, 6-8pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

Sayantani DasGupta. “Narrative Humility: Medical Listening and Oral History.”

Thursday, October 16, 6-8pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

November

Brian Purnell. ” Can the Oral Historian Speak?

Thursday, November 6, 6-8pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

Nicki Berger. “Oral History and Intellectual Disability: Navigating Authority, Authorship, and Advocacy.

Thursday, November 13, 6-8pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

Stay posted for upcoming events in the Spring!

Feb. 5: Ann Cvetkovich. “After Depression: Reflections on Oral and Written Personal Narrative as Archive of Feelings.”

Feb. 12: Joanne Ahola. “Finding the Contours of Torture.”

Feb. 26: Christopher Sellers. “Stories of Environmental Danger: A Collective
Approach.”

Mar. 5: Kathy Davis. “Bodies, Embodiment, and the Experience of Passion: What Tango Dancers Can Teach Us.”

Mar. 12: Lynda Crane and Tracy McDonough. “Oral History with Vulnerable Populations: The Schizophrenia Oral History Project.

Mar. 26: Ron Doel. “Oral History and the History of Science and Medicine.”

Apr. 2: Alessandro Portelli. “Stories I Skipped: Narratives of Care, Narratives of War.

Apr. 16: Ynestra King. “Listening with the Whole Body in Mind Feminist Oral History Project.”

Apr. 30: Aline Gubrium and Elizabeth L. Krause.”Digital Storytelling as Narrative Shock: New Views on Young Parenting Latinas, Migration, and Family.

Please refer to oralhistory.columbia.edu for updated information, or email Amy Starecheski, Associate Director of OHMA, at aas39(at)columbia.edu.

APPLY: 2014 Summer Institute, Second Generation Memories and Stories

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE AND APPLY

The Center for Oral History Research and INCITE (Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics) are pleased to announce our 2014 Summer Institute, “Second Generation Memories and Stories,” to be held June 16-27, 2014 at Columbia University in New York City. The program will explore the ways in which memories are formed and transmitted through family, cultural, political and social frames and experiences. Oral history has been a central methodology in exploring global themes of identity and post-memory through second-generation stories of immigration, migration, poverty, trauma and genocide, displacement and exile. Oral history also provides a setting for intimate exchanges between families, communities and cultures in a way that preserves and secures local and indigenous knowledge across generations, cultures and ethnicities: engendering individual and social resilience.

We encourage applicants to use the Institute to explore a broad range of applications of second-generation oral history research in contemporary contexts and fields including public health and medicine, immigration studies (including the impact of post-9/11 US policies on immigrant communities), sociology and social science more generally. The program will include presentations on how scholars, museums and memorials have used second-generation oral histories, and testimony, in ways that are crucial to illuminating forgotten or misunderstood experiences. The Institute will also include practical workshops in digital storytelling, interviewing and editing.

Core faculty will include:• Mary Marshall Clark, Director of the Columbia Center for Oral History Research and co-director of the Oral History Master of Arts Program at the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics of Columbia University;

Peter Bearman, Director of the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics and co-director of the Oral History Master of Arts Program;

Doug Boyd, Director of the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries;

Alessandro Portelli, Professor of Anglo-American Literature at the University of Rome-La Sapienza;

Terrell Frazier, Director of Education and Outreach at the Columbia Center for Oral History;

Amy Starecheski, Associate Director of the Oral History Master of Arts Program at the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics of Columbia University;

Ronald J. Grele, Director Emeritus of the Columbia Center for Oral History;

Linda Shopes, Former President of the U.S. Oral History Association, Freelance Editor and Consultant in Oral and Public History.

• CCOHR staff, students from the Oral History Master of Arts Program (OHMA), and others who have worked in the archive will enrich our discussions with their interpretations.

Low-cost on-campus housing will be available for those outside of the New York City area.

Please contact Terrell Frazier with any questions.

http://incite.columbia.edu/summer-institute-ccohr/

CCOHR Joins Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) in New Partnership

In a pathbreaking move that has strengthened the Columbia Center for Oral History (CCOH), the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) has partnered with the Columbia University Libraries in managing and administering the activities and programs of the CCOH. INCITE and its founder Peter Bearman (Sociology) have worked closely with the staff of CCOH over the years, particularly in the development of the September 11, 2001 Oral History Projects and the Oral History Master of Arts program.

Under the terms of the new partnership, INCITE will have responsibility for the research, education, and outreach activities of CCOH. These include new oral history projects, the Oral History Master of Arts program (which was already jointly administered by CCOH and INCITE), the Summer Institute, and public programming. All of these activities will take shape under the CCOHR. The R stands for Research. The Libraries, in turn, will focus its energies on the curatorial and archiving aspects of CCOH’s mission. The Libraries will devote more staff and attention to acquiring, processing, and making more generally available the rich set of resources that comprise the CCOH archive. All of these activities will take shape under the CCOHA, the A stands for Archives. This new relationship thus anchors CCOH firmly in faculty research and teaching, while bolstering Columbia University Libraries commitments to professional archival management through the Rare Book & Manuscript Library (RBML).

This semester, Mary Marshall Clark, director of CCOHR, along with program coordinators David Briand and Sarah Dziedzic, all officially joined the INCITE team. The CCOHR will carry out a full portfolio of new and important oral history projects. CCOHA will continue to provide reference and support services under the management of the RBML. Research activities will take place at INCITE’s research space at 122nd and Broadway.

Click here to learn more about CCOHR.

The Interdisciplinary Center Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) cultivates public intelligence concerning socially and culturally vital ideas that can be advanced by research, education and conversation at the interdisciplinary seams that the social sciences share with one another, the humanities, the life and behavioral sciences: incite.columbia.edu.

The Columbia Center for Oral History Research‘s mission is to record unique life histories, document the central historical events and memories of our times, and to teach and do research across the disciplines: http://incite.columbia.edu/ccohr/

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 11 million volumes, over 150,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers. The Libraries employs more than 500 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

 

Upcoming Workshop: Movement Creates Museum, 4/25 at 6PM

The Columbia Center for Oral History, the Oral History Master of Arts (OHMA) Program, the MA in Museum Anthropology, and the Institute for Research in African-American Studies Present:

Movement Creates Museum:
The Activist Beginnings of Weeksville Heritage Center

WHO: Jennifer Scott is an Anthropologist, Public Historian, and Curator. She serves as the Vice Director/Director of Research at Weeksville Heritage Center, a historic house museum specializing in innovative study and applications of history, culture, the arts and civic engagement. An oral historian, she spearheads Weeksville’s oral history project, conducts oral history workshops, and has served on oral history advisory boards, including StoryCorps Griot.

WHEN: Thursday, April 25, 2013, 6:00-8:00pm.

WHERE: Columbia University, Northwest Corner Building, Room 602, 550 West 120th Street, 6th floor. Enter campus at 116th Street, at either Broadway or Amsterdam. Campus Map.

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP: Scott will be discussing the role and possibilities of oral history for understanding activism and social change in the founding and expansion of a public history center. Weeksville Heritage Center’s (WHC) oral history program began in the 1970s alongside the rediscovery and reclamation of a “lost” history. Founded in 1972 in Brooklyn, WHC currently consists of the historic Hunterfly Road Houses, three nineteenth century wood-frame residential structures that have been restored and opened to the public. Through research, tours, exhibitions and programs, WHC interprets the forgotten history of Weeksville, a free black, intentional, land-owning community, which established its own schools, churches, anti-slavery organizations, and operated as a safe space for African Americans in the greater New York area throughout the 19th century.

SPONSORS: This talk is part of the “Paul F. Lazarsfeld Lecture Series,” co-sponsored by the Columbia Center for Oral History (CCOH), Oral History Master of Arts Program (OHMA), the MA in Museum Anthropology, and the Institute for Research in African-American Studies. Support from the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) is provided for programming that embodies late Professor Paul Lazarsfeld’s commitment to improving methodological approaches that address concerns of vital cultural and social significance.

INFORMATION: For more information, please email Terrell Frazier at terrellfrazier@columbia.edu

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

NO REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

Conference: Oral History and Our Times, May 1-2

May 1-2, 2013
A-TWO-DAY CONFERENCE

ORAL HISTORY AND OUR TIMES



Free & Open to the Public

The Columbia Center for Oral History [CCOH], of the Columbia Libraries, and the Oral History Master of Arts program [OHMA], through INCITE’s Paul F. Lazarsfeld Lecture Series, are hosting a two-day conference exploring the role of oral history in documenting, disseminating and educating students and the public about the central events and concerns of our times — featuring the Rule of Law Oral History Project and impact of U.S. detention and rendition policies over the last decade. The conference will also survey the impact of Columbia’s path-breaking Oral History Master of Arts program [OHMA], the first program of its kind in the U.S., now in its fifth year. The conference gathers leading experts in the fields of oral history, human rights, and the arts.

The first day of the conference, May 1st, will conclude with a keynote (6:00 – 8:00 p.m.) by Stephen Soldz, Director of the Center for Research, Evaluation, and Program Development at the Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis and public activist. Soldz will discuss the uses and impact of psychological torture on those held at Guantanamo and other black sites, and the impact of condoning torture on democracy.

The second day of the conference, May 2nd, will feature a presentation on the WKCR/Center for Jazz Studies Oral History Project. Brent Edwards, a professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature and the co-director of the Project (with Ben Young, the director of WKCR, the Columbia University radio station), will discuss the issues raised by oral history in the performing arts and the   unique approach of the Project, which involves the extensive use of archival material (including recordings, date books, programs, and flyers) in the oral history process.

In connection with this conference, there will be interactive oral history workshops May 2 from 12:15 – 1:45 p.m., taught by OHMA students and alumni, free to the public. Register now for a workshop to reserve your spot.

PROGRAM

Wednesday, May 1, 2013: [Buell Hall, East Gallery, 1st floor, 515 West 116th Street]

10:00a.m. – 11:30a.m.  |  Panel I –  Bearing Witness: The Detainee Experience

Introduction by Terrell Frazier, Education and Outreach Director, Columbia Center for Oral History

Daniel Heyman, Artist, Rhode Island School of Design
Gerry Albarelli, Interviewer, Columbia Center for Oral History
Louis Massiah, Filmmaker, Scribe Video Center
Steven Reisner, Psychologist, President-Elect, Psychologists for Social Responsibility

Screening: Video Selections from the Rule of Law Oral History Project

Moderator: Liz Ševčenko, Director, Guantánamo Public Memory Project, Columbia University Institute for the Study of Human Rights

11:45a.m. – 1:00p.m.  |  Lunch

1:00p.m. – 2:45p.m.  |  Panel II – Outside the Rule of Law: Illuminating Struggles for Justice

Michael Ratner, President Emeritus, Center for Constitutional Rights
Pardiss Kebriaei, Senior Staff Attorney, Center for Constitutional Rights
Ron Grele, Director Emeritus, Columbia Center for Oral History
Zachary Katznelson, Senior Staff Attorney, American Civil Liberties Union
Moderator: David Briand, Rule of Law Project Coordinator, Columbia Center for Oral History

3:00p.m. – 4:30p.m.  |  Panel III – Secrecy and the Right to Know: Oral History and our Times

Nathaniel Raymond, Human Rights Investigator
Mary Marshall Clark, Interviewer
Carol Rosenberg, Journalist, The Miami Herald
Moderator: Peter Bearman, Jonathan Cole Professor of Sociology, Columbia University

6:00p.m. – 8:00p.m.  |  Keynote Address – Psychologists and Torture: Denial and the Corruption of Civil Society

Stephen Soldz, Professor, Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis



Thursday, May 2, 2013
: [Buell Hall, East Gallery, 1st floor, 515 West 116th Street]

10:00a.m. – 11:30a.m.  | Sounding the Archive: Notes on Jazz Oral History

Introduction by Mary Marshall Clark, Director, Columbia Center for Oral History

Brent Hayes Edwards, Professor, Department of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University

12:15p.m. – 1:45p.m

(Note: Pre-registration was required. Guests are welcome to sign up on standby list at registration table in the lobby.)

Public Workshop I — by Lauren Taylor
Convergences and Divergences of Oral History and Psychotherapy

This workshop will examine the convergences and divergences of oral history and psychotherapy. Public and private themes will be explored in a sociocultural context, with a focus on trauma interviewing. Participants will learn how narrative may be developed to therapeutic effect in a range of clinical and non-clinical settings.

Public Workshop II — by Marie Scatena
Designing Oral History Projects: What is the message, why is it important and who got it?

This workshop goes through the steps of planning an oral history project with attention to backward design. We’ll explore how the original intention of the collecting effort is reflected in tangible and intangible outcomes.

Public Workshop III — by Sewon Christina Chung
Stories Beyond Digital Tools

Explore the world of interactive web technology, and gain hands-on experience utilizing new storytelling platforms and social media outlets for oral history.

2:00p.m. – 4:00p.m.  |  Oral History Dialogues

Intersubjectivity in Oral History, Social Work, and Psychology: OHMA alum Lauren Taylor in conversation with Columbia Center for Oral History Director Mary Marshall Clark.

Oral History, Environmental Studies, and Community: OHMA alum Shanna Farrell in conversation with NYC Department of Sanitation Anthropologist-in-Residence Robin Nagle

Oral History, Art Criticism, and Contested Memory: OHMA alum Jeanmarie Theobalds in conversation with Michele Saliola, Director of Programs at the Judd Foundation

4:30p.m. – 6:00p.m.  |  Multimedia Oral History Showcase and Reception

Please join us for this multimedia showcase of current Oral History MA student thesis work in video, audio, online and edible forms. Celebrate OHMA’s 5th Anniversary and our graduating students with us at a wine and cheese reception while exploring our students’ work via interactive stations.

Reem Aboukhater, Pursuing Happiness in Urban Society
Nicki Pombier-Berger, About Us.
Ellen Brooks, Stories of the Skin
Sewon Chung, Listening to Central Park North: An Interactive Oral History Mapping Project
Ellen Coon, Mha Puja
Hana Crawford, How I Learned to Act: An Oral History of Social Performance
Erica Fugger, Sangha Stories: Tales of Engaged Buddhism from the Upper West Side
Miriam Laytner, Brooklyn Storytellers
Kyana Moghadam, A Country Between
Sam Robson, Conversations with Very Forgetful People
Maye Saephanh, A Guerilla’s Journey
Elisabeth Sydor, I. Love. America.
Sara Wolcott, Apagie Musha Oral History Project

Sponsored by the Columbia Center for Oral History [CCOH] and the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, of the Columbia Libraries, the Oral History Master of Arts program, through INCITE’s Paul F. Lazarsfeld Lecture Series, Columbia Maison Francaise, and The Heyman Center for the Humanities.

Workshop: The Making of Antonia Pantoja: ¡Presente!, March 14 AT COLUMBIA

The Oral History Master of Arts (OHMA) Program, Columbia Center for Oral History, and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity Presents:

Uncovering Hidden Histories
The Making of Antonia Pantoja: ¡Presente!

WHO: For over thirty years, Lillian Jiménez has worked as a media arts center manager, independent producer, media activist, exhibitor, funder and educator. She has conducted media literacy workshops on Latino stereotypes, self-representation, color/race, power & social relations, and the construction of whiteness. She worked for five years with the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College on a series of oral histories that chronicle the Puerto Rican community’s institution-building period in New York. She is currently working on a new documentary about the Puerto Rican Left in New York City.

WHEN: Thursday, March 14, 2013, 6:00-8:00pm.

WHERE: Columbia University, Knox Hall, Room 509, 550 West 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP: This workshop will discuss the context surrounding the creation of “Antonia Pantoja: ¡Presente!” a documentary on the work of Puerto Rican educator and visionary leader, Antonia Pantoja. Dr. Pantoja founded Aspira, the premiere Puerto Rican/Latino leadership organization in the US and in Puerto Rico, shepherding thousands upon thousands of youth into college and a professional life. Utilizing the extensive seventeen-hour oral history Lillian Jiménez conducted with Dr. Pantoja and countless other oral histories of her collaborators, the documentary was fashioned after her death in 2002. Jiménez will present the methodologies utilized in conducting the oral histories of Pantoja’s collaborators as well as adversaries. Using documentary excerpts, the hidden history of Puerto Ricans and the paradigm shift from stereotypical victim to agent of action will be explored through Dr. Pantoja’s work.

SPONSORS: This talk is part of the “Paul F. Lazarsfeld Lecture Series,” co-sponsored by the Columbia Center for Oral History (CCOH), Oral History Master of Arts Program (OHMA), and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity. Support from the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) is provided for programming that embodies late Professor Paul Lazarsfeld’s commitment to improving methodological approaches that address concerns of vital cultural and social significance.

INFORMATION: For more information, please email Terrell Frazier at terrellfrazier@columbia.edu

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

NO REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED