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Public Screening and Conversation: One Generation’s Time: The Legacy of Silme Domingo & Gene Viernes

The Columbia Center for Oral History Research Presents
A Public Screening and Conversation:

One Generation’s Time: The Legacy of Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes

domingo-viernes1About: One Generation’s Time: The Legacy of Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes explores the legacy and impact of the work and lives of Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes, two Filipino-American activists and fishing cannery union members who were murdered for their involvement in union reform and workers’ rights activism.

WHEN: Tuesday, June 17, 6:00-8:00pm.

WHERE: Columbia University, Knox Hall, Room 509, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

MORE INFORMATION: Doors open at 6:00 p.m.; screening of the one-hour documentary starts at 6:10 p.m.; followed by a post-film discussion led by documentary co-producer Ron Chew and public historian and curator Jennifer Scott.

Ron Chew is the author of Remembering Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes: The Legacy of Filipino American Labor Activism. He served as executive director of the Wing Luke Asian Museum from 1991-2007. Known as an innovator using cutting-edge presentations with a locally oriented emphasis, Chew helped redefine museums by melding cultural identity, civic participation, and museum programs into a new tool in the fight for social justice.

Jennifer Scott is a Part-Time Professor at The New School for Public Engagement, Parsons School of Art and Design History and Theory, and Pratt Institute’s Graduate School of Arts and Cultural Management in New York, where she teaches courses in cultural anthropology, material culture, world heritage, museum studies, and cultural pluralism. Scott, most recently, served for ten years as the Vice-Director and Director of Research at Weeksville Heritage Center, a historic house museum specializing in innovative study and applications of history, culture, the arts and civic engagement.

For more information, please email Terrell Frazier at terrellfrazier[at]columbia.edu

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

 

CCOHR Joins Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) in New Partnership

In a pathbreaking move that has strengthened the Columbia Center for Oral History (CCOH), the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) has partnered with the Columbia University Libraries in managing and administering the activities and programs of the CCOH. INCITE and its founder Peter Bearman (Sociology) have worked closely with the staff of CCOH over the years, particularly in the development of the September 11, 2001 Oral History Projects and the Oral History Master of Arts program.

Under the terms of the new partnership, INCITE will have responsibility for the research, education, and outreach activities of CCOH. These include new oral history projects, the Oral History Master of Arts program (which was already jointly administered by CCOH and INCITE), the Summer Institute, and public programming. All of these activities will take shape under the CCOHR. The R stands for Research. The Libraries, in turn, will focus its energies on the curatorial and archiving aspects of CCOH’s mission. The Libraries will devote more staff and attention to acquiring, processing, and making more generally available the rich set of resources that comprise the CCOH archive. All of these activities will take shape under the CCOHA, the A stands for Archives. This new relationship thus anchors CCOH firmly in faculty research and teaching, while bolstering Columbia University Libraries commitments to professional archival management through the Rare Book & Manuscript Library (RBML).

This semester, Mary Marshall Clark, director of CCOHR, along with program coordinators David Briand and Sarah Dziedzic, all officially joined the INCITE team. The CCOHR will carry out a full portfolio of new and important oral history projects. CCOHA will continue to provide reference and support services under the management of the RBML. Research activities will take place at INCITE’s research space at 122nd and Broadway.

Click here to learn more about CCOHR.

The Interdisciplinary Center Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) cultivates public intelligence concerning socially and culturally vital ideas that can be advanced by research, education and conversation at the interdisciplinary seams that the social sciences share with one another, the humanities, the life and behavioral sciences: incite.columbia.edu.

The Columbia Center for Oral History Research‘s mission is to record unique life histories, document the central historical events and memories of our times, and to teach and do research across the disciplines: http://incite.columbia.edu/ccohr/

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 11 million volumes, over 150,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers. The Libraries employs more than 500 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

 

Join us at Public Events for Our 2013 Summer Institute!

CCOH 2013 Summer institute
“Telling the World: Indigenous Memories, Rights, and Narratives”

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 4:00-6:00pm — “One Nurse-Midwife’s Story: Dr. Ruth Lubic in Conversation with Elizabeth Hegeman”

LOCATION: Columbia University, 203 Butler Library, Morningside Heights Campus Google Map, Campus Map

At a time when the infant mortality rate in Washington, DC was twice that of the rest of the nation, Ruth Lubic stepped in.

Join the Columbia Center for Oral History for an evening with Ruth Lubic, nurse-midwife, MacArthur Fellowship recipient, and founder of the DC Birth Center at the Developing Families Center. In conversation with Elizabeth Hageman, the evening will feature stories of her advocacy for “high-touch, low-tech” approaches to family care before and after childbirth. Lubic was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship of $375,000 over five years in 1993 for her work in New York’s South Bronx, where she opened the first state-approved center in the country, the Morris Heights Childbearing Center. Shifting her attention to Washington DC, Lubic opened the DC Birth Center in 2000 to make care available where infant mortality was disproportionately high.

Ruth Lubic co-founded the National Association of Childbearing Centers in 1983 and has helped establish more than 200 free-standing birth centers.



THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 6:00-8:00pm — “Language Revitalization: Harnessing New Technologies”

LOCATION: Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Annex, Morningside Heights Campus . Google MapCampus Map.

Globalization has been compared to colonization in terms of language dominance and subsequent homogenization. However, new technologies, a hallmark of globalization can be exploited and developed to aid in language revitalization efforts. In this presentation Drs. Tania Ka’ai and Rachel Ka’ai-Mahuta will explore some of the work conducted in Te Ipukarea: The National Māori Language Institute and the International Centre for Language Revitalisation. The presentation will feature the Reo Online Language Systems.

Dr. Ka’ai is the Director of Te Ipukarea and Te Whare Rongomaurikura and also a Professor in Māori Innovation and Development at the Auckland University of Tehnology, Aotearoa/New Zealand. Dr. Ka’ai-Mahuta is of New Zealand Māori, Native Hawaiian, Cook Island Māori, and Samoan descent. Rachael is a Senior Lecturer in Te Ara Poutama, Faculty of Māori Development, and Associate Director of Te Whare o Rongomaurikura at AUT. MORE INFO HERE



MONDAY, JUNE 17, 5:30-7:30pm — “Māori Song and Oral Tradition”

LOCATION: Columbia University, Knox Hall, Room 509 (5th Floor), 606 West 122nd Street, Morningside Heights Campus, Google Map, Campus Map

The Māori language is traditionally an exclusively oral language. Therefore, Māori knowledge, histories, and traditions have been preserved and disseminated through the oral tradition. This rich oral tradition has taken on many forms, including waiata (Māori song). In this presentation, Dr. Rachel Ka’ai-Mahuta will examine the importance of waiata and issues of preserving and disseminating waiata for future generations.



TUESDAY, JUNE 18, 3:30-5:30pm — “Oral History, Storyweaving & Documentary Theater”

LOCATION: Columbia University, 203 Butler Library, Morningside Heights Campus Google MapCampus Map

Since its founding in 1976, Spiderwoman Theatre has broken new ground in using storytelling and story weaving as the basis for the creation of their theatrical pieces.

Join Oral History Master of Arts student and stage manager Sara Sinclair for a discussion of her work alongside director Murial Miguel in the production of “Violence – The Next Generation,” a multigenerational theatre production at Spiderwoman Theatre. Weaving together stories of personal and family violence, three generations of Indigenous women relay their stories of transcending violence in their lives and communities.

Sinclair will present her work to organically layer the women’s words with movement, text, sound, music, and visual images, creating a script from the women’s stories.



THESE EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

NO REGISTRATION REQUIRED 

Public Event, Language Revitalization: Harnessing New Technologies, June 13 AT COLUMBIA

CCOH 2013 Summer Institute
Telling the World: Indigenous Memories, Rights, and Narratives

THURSDAY JUNE 13 | LANGUAGE REVITALIZATION: HARNESSING NEW TECHNOLOGIES

WHO: Dr. Tania Ka’ai is the Director of Te Ipukarea (The National Māori Language Institute) and Te Whare Rongomaurikura (The International Center for Language Revitalisation) and also a Professor in Māori Innovation and Development at at the Auckland University of Tehnology, Aotearoa/New Zealand. As an Indigenous scholar teaching and researching in a university, Tania uses the cultural values transmitted by her Māori and Pacific elders and mentors as an epistemological framework to inform her academic writing and teaching within the academy.

Dr. Rachael Ka’ai-Mahuta is of New Zealand Māori, Native Hawaiian, Cook Island Māori, and Samoan descent. Rachael is a Senior Lecturer in Te Ara Poutama, Faculty of Māori Development, and Associate Director of Te Whare o Rongomaurikura at AUT. Rachael is also a Researcher in Te Ipukarea, and has worked on several projects focussed on the revitalisation of the Māori language. Rachael’s research interests include the history and politics of the Māori language, the Māori oral tradition (particularly Māori song), Māori politics, and comparative Indigenous politics.

WHEN: Thursday, June 13, 2013, 6:00-8:00pm.

WHERE: Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Annex, Morningside Heights Campus, Google Map, Campus Map.

ABOUT THE PRESENTATION: Globalization has been compared to colonization in terms of language dominance and subsequent homogenization. However, new technologies, a hallmark of globalization can be exploited and developed to aid in language revitalization efforts. This presentation will explore some of the work conducted in Te Ipukarea: The National Māori Language Institute and the International Centre for Language Revitalisation. The presentation will feature the Reo Online Language Systems.

INFORMATION: For more information, please email Terrell Frazier at terrellfrazier@columbia.edu

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

NO REGISTRATION REQUIRED

[Video] Using Oral History to Find New Solutions to Intimate Violence

Alisa del Tufo, in a career dedicated to ending violence in the lives of women and girls, has founded three organizations: Sanctuary for Families, CONNECT, and Threshold Collaborative. She is the author of two books on domestic violence and child abuse, the recipient of Union Theological Seminary’s prestigious Distinguished Alumna Award, and Colgate University’s Humanitarian Award in 2008. She has used oral history as a method of finding new ways to address the complex issues of intimate partner and domestic violence since 1991. In a public workshop on January 31, 2013, del Tufo shares the history of this work and some of the sea changing ideas that have grown from it.

This workshop was co-sponsored by the Columbia Center for Oral History, Oral History Master of Arts Program, Columbia University School of Social Work, the Center for Gender and Sexuality Law, and Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics.

Oral History Open House and Book Talk: Thursday, Feb. 21 AT COLUMBIA

The Oral History Master of Arts (OHMA) Program, Institute for the Study of Human Rights, the Columbia Journalism School and Voice of Witness Present:

Everybody’s A Stranger When They First Arrive:
Refugees’ Experiences in America

WHO: Gabriele Stabile, is an Italian photographer based in New York City. His photography has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal. Juliet Linderman is a reporter for the Times-Picayune. Formerly the editor of a small community newspaper, she has written for many publications including The New York Times and Village Voice. The two will discuss the newest title from Voice of Witness, Refugee Hotel, a collection of photography and oral histories that documents the experiences of refugees in the United States. Staff will also be on hand to talk with prospective students about the Oral History Master of Arts (OHMA) program at Columbia University.

WHEN: Thursday, February 21, 2013, 6:00-8:00pm.

WHERE: Columbia Journalism School, Stabile Student Center, Morningside Heights Campus, 2950 Broadway NY, NY 10027. Enter campus at 116th Street, at either Broadway or Amsterdam. Google Map, Campus Map.

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP Join Gabriele and Juliet for a presentation and discussion on the role of oral history in contemporary human rights and photojournalism. The editors will discuss and read from their new book, in which evocative images are coupled with moving testimonies from men and women who have resettled in the United States from Burundi, Iraq, Burma, Somalia, Bhutan, and Ethopia. In their narratives, they describe their first days in the US, the lives they’ve left behind, and the communities they have since created.

There will also be a presentation from faculty and alumni about the Oral History Master of Arts (OHMA), a multi-disciplinary program that utilizes theoretical approaches across the social sciences and humanities.

SPONSORS: This talk is part of the “Paul F. Lazarsfeld Lecture Series,” co-sponsored by the Columbia Center for Oral History (CCOH), the Oral History Master of Arts Program(OHMA), the Institute for the Study of Human Rights, and the Columbia Journalism School. Support from the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) is provided for programming that embodies late Professor Paul Lazarsfeld’s commitment to improving methodological approaches that address concerns of vital cultural and social significance.

INFORMATION: For more information, please email Terrell Frazier at terrellfrazier@columbia.edu

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

NO REGISTRATION REQUIRED