Category Archives: Workshop Series

Join us for Our 2014-2015 Workshop Series: Oral History, Medicine, and Health

Fall 2014 Oral History Workshop Series: Oral History, Medicine, and Health

This academic year in our public workshop series, in partnership with the Program in Narrative Medicine, the Oral History MA Program at Columbia University will be exploring the intersections of oral history, health and medicine. As public health professionals experiment with using oral history to access new realms of knowledge about health and social life, practitioners of narrative medicine deploy oral history to engage with patients, and oral historians partner with people with disabilities, dementia, and mental illness to record and amplify their stories, the time is right for an in-depth multidisciplinary engagement of the productive areas where these fields meet.

Full schedule and descriptions

All Events are Free and Open to the Public
Campus Map.

September

Sam Robson. “Oral History Meets Dementia: A Staged Reading of the Play Timothy and Mary.”

Thursday, September 11, 6-8pm, The Faculty House at Columbia University, Seminar Room One.

Luke Gerwe. “Seeking Witness: Voice of Witness and Building an Oral History Network.”

Thursday, September 18, 6-8pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

October

Teiji Okamoto. “A Radical Archive of Be(long)ing.”

Thursday, October 2, 6-8pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

Sayantani DasGupta. “Narrative Humility: Medical Listening and Oral History.”

Thursday, October 16, 6-8pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

November

Brian Purnell. ” Can the Oral Historian Speak?

Thursday, November 6, 6-8pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

Nicki Berger. “Oral History and Intellectual Disability: Navigating Authority, Authorship, and Advocacy.

Thursday, November 13, 6-8pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor.

Stay posted for upcoming events in the Spring!

Feb. 5: Ann Cvetkovich. “After Depression: Reflections on Oral and Written Personal Narrative as Archive of Feelings.”

Feb. 12: Joanne Ahola. “Finding the Contours of Torture.”

Feb. 26: Christopher Sellers. “Stories of Environmental Danger: A Collective
Approach.”

Mar. 5: Kathy Davis. “Bodies, Embodiment, and the Experience of Passion: What Tango Dancers Can Teach Us.”

Mar. 12: Lynda Crane and Tracy McDonough. “Oral History with Vulnerable Populations: The Schizophrenia Oral History Project.

Mar. 26: Ron Doel. “Oral History and the History of Science and Medicine.”

Apr. 2: Alessandro Portelli. “Stories I Skipped: Narratives of Care, Narratives of War.

Apr. 16: Ynestra King. “Listening with the Whole Body in Mind Feminist Oral History Project.”

Apr. 30: Aline Gubrium and Elizabeth L. Krause.”Digital Storytelling as Narrative Shock: New Views on Young Parenting Latinas, Migration, and Family.

Please refer to oralhistory.columbia.edu for updated information, or email Amy Starecheski, Associate Director of OHMA, at aas39(at)columbia.edu.

Fall 2013 Oral History Workshop Series

Fall 2013 Oral History Workshop Series

This series is co-sponsored by the Columbia Center for Oral History (CCOH) and the Oral History Master of Arts Program (OHMA). All of our workshops are free and open to the public and will explore the myriad of ethical and practical issues raised by the practice of oral history in the different disciplines within the humanities and social sciences.

All of the events in the Oral History Workshop are funded through the Paul F. Lazarsfeld Lecture Series, which provides support for events that honor the legacy of the former Columbia professor.

September

Darija Marić “Personal Memories of war and Detention in Croatia from 1941 until Today: Making Private Experiences Public as a Means of Mobilizing Support and Developing Understanding

Thursday, September 12, 6:30-8:30pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map. [More Information]

Co-sponsored by the Institute for the Study of Human Rights

Daniel Wolff “Listening to New Orleans

Thursday, September 26, 6:30-8:30pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

October

Avner GvaryahuOur Harsh Logic: Israeli Soldiers’ Testimonies from the Occupied Territories 2000-2010

Monday, October 7, 6:30-8:30pm, 523 Butler Library, 535 West 114th Street, 5th floor. Campus Map. [Flyer]

Co-sponsored by The Middle East Institute

Muriel MiguelFrom Storytelling to Storyweaving: Muriel Miguel, A Retrospective

Thursday, October 24, 6:30-8:30pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

November

Audrey Petty (Voice of Witness) “High Rise Stories” 

Thursday, November 7, 6:30-8:30pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

Jeff Friedman “The Eros of Oral History” 

Thursday, November 21, 6:30-8:30pm, Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

All events are free and open to the public

Please refer to oralhistory.columbia.edu for updated information

 

Upcoming Workshop: Movement Creates Museum, 4/25 at 6PM

The Columbia Center for Oral History, the Oral History Master of Arts (OHMA) Program, the MA in Museum Anthropology, and the Institute for Research in African-American Studies Present:

Movement Creates Museum:
The Activist Beginnings of Weeksville Heritage Center

WHO: Jennifer Scott is an Anthropologist, Public Historian, and Curator. She serves as the Vice Director/Director of Research at Weeksville Heritage Center, a historic house museum specializing in innovative study and applications of history, culture, the arts and civic engagement. An oral historian, she spearheads Weeksville’s oral history project, conducts oral history workshops, and has served on oral history advisory boards, including StoryCorps Griot.

WHEN: Thursday, April 25, 2013, 6:00-8:00pm.

WHERE: Columbia University, Northwest Corner Building, Room 602, 550 West 120th Street, 6th floor. Enter campus at 116th Street, at either Broadway or Amsterdam. Campus Map.

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP: Scott will be discussing the role and possibilities of oral history for understanding activism and social change in the founding and expansion of a public history center. Weeksville Heritage Center’s (WHC) oral history program began in the 1970s alongside the rediscovery and reclamation of a “lost” history. Founded in 1972 in Brooklyn, WHC currently consists of the historic Hunterfly Road Houses, three nineteenth century wood-frame residential structures that have been restored and opened to the public. Through research, tours, exhibitions and programs, WHC interprets the forgotten history of Weeksville, a free black, intentional, land-owning community, which established its own schools, churches, anti-slavery organizations, and operated as a safe space for African Americans in the greater New York area throughout the 19th century.

SPONSORS: This talk is part of the “Paul F. Lazarsfeld Lecture Series,” co-sponsored by the Columbia Center for Oral History (CCOH), Oral History Master of Arts Program (OHMA), the MA in Museum Anthropology, and the Institute for Research in African-American Studies. Support from the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) is provided for programming that embodies late Professor Paul Lazarsfeld’s commitment to improving methodological approaches that address concerns of vital cultural and social significance.

INFORMATION: For more information, please email Terrell Frazier at terrellfrazier@columbia.edu

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

NO REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

Doug Boyd Discusses Future of Online Oral History Access

The following post was written by OHMA student Erica Fugger:

On Thursday, February 14, Doug Boyd, Ph.D. spoke in open dialogue to the current Oral History Master of Arts (OHMA) cohort before addressing a larger crowd at an event open to the public. Boyd currently serves as Director of the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries, and is renowned for his extensive work on Oral History in the Digital Age.

Earlier in the session, Boyd traced his career from early studies in the discipline of history and an interest in music to a focus on folklore and audio restoration. While addressing the specifics of his background in the field, Boyd excitedly spoke about his graduate work in noise reduction while digitizing the tapes of Henry Glassie. Citing direct experience, Boyd noted how ambient noise can be mistaken for the standard ‘pop’ well known to analog, as was the case when Glassie’s tapes picked up the sound of burning peat during field recordings across Ballymenone of County Fermanagh in the north of Ireland.

Speaking to the writing of his most recent book, Crawfish Bottom: Recovering a Lost Kentucky Community, Boyd detailed the process of compiling a historical portrait that includes time period documents alongside oral histories. He especially discussed how differences in interviewing style can change the type of information that is unearthed and the perspective conveyed about hidden stories within a community.

From this initial discussion, the OHMA cohort was given an energizing perspective on the multitude of career paths that lead to work in the field of oral history. We ourselves make up a diverse group of graduate students, ranging from those who were introduced to the discipline while studying history or anthropology in college to professionals and filmmakers who have long been working out in the field. Boyd’s honesty and insight provided a point of enthusiasm, especially for the countless possibilities that the digital age brings to oral history interviewing.

The second part of the talk included a comprehensive look at the Oral History Metadata Synchronizer (OHMS), a program Boyd has had a hand in developing, that matches oral history audio files with their written components in online displays. Of particular interest to archives that are digitizing their interviews for public access, the coming release of OHMS as an open source program can alleviate some of the pressures of transcription by providing audio and text link ups based on indexed metadata.

Boyd spoke with passion about the possibility of reaching out to the communities with whom the oral histories were conducted to engage them in the process of tagging the interview themes through OHMS. While such crowdsourcing sounds appealing, it is another question whether it is reliable, practical, and ethical when it comes to managing the contents of oral history interviews. But these, too, are the issues that one must already consider when contemplating the release of interviews to digital access on the internet. Certainly, legality in terms of the narrator’s rights and intentions must be examined before providing such services.

The program is still in the development stage as a plug in for Omeka, a publishing platform popular for online museum and oral history exhibitions, but is currently utilized by the University of Kentucky Libraries. OHMS shares functional similarities to the qualitative analysis software NVivo with the exception that the focus in this case is on making the interviews available for public access rather than research processing. Interestingly, it also offers a different approach to other services in the field, most notably, in comparison to the work of Michael Frisch’s The Randforce Associates, LLC, which instead segments the oral histories into passages in order to manage recurrent themes throughout collections.

Oral History Open House and Book Talk: Thursday, Feb. 21 AT COLUMBIA

The Oral History Master of Arts (OHMA) Program, Institute for the Study of Human Rights, the Columbia Journalism School and Voice of Witness Present:

Everybody’s A Stranger When They First Arrive:
Refugees’ Experiences in America

WHO: Gabriele Stabile, is an Italian photographer based in New York City. His photography has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal. Juliet Linderman is a reporter for the Times-Picayune. Formerly the editor of a small community newspaper, she has written for many publications including The New York Times and Village Voice. The two will discuss the newest title from Voice of Witness, Refugee Hotel, a collection of photography and oral histories that documents the experiences of refugees in the United States. Staff will also be on hand to talk with prospective students about the Oral History Master of Arts (OHMA) program at Columbia University.

WHEN: Thursday, February 21, 2013, 6:00-8:00pm.

WHERE: Columbia Journalism School, Stabile Student Center, Morningside Heights Campus, 2950 Broadway NY, NY 10027. Enter campus at 116th Street, at either Broadway or Amsterdam. Google Map, Campus Map.

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP Join Gabriele and Juliet for a presentation and discussion on the role of oral history in contemporary human rights and photojournalism. The editors will discuss and read from their new book, in which evocative images are coupled with moving testimonies from men and women who have resettled in the United States from Burundi, Iraq, Burma, Somalia, Bhutan, and Ethopia. In their narratives, they describe their first days in the US, the lives they’ve left behind, and the communities they have since created.

There will also be a presentation from faculty and alumni about the Oral History Master of Arts (OHMA), a multi-disciplinary program that utilizes theoretical approaches across the social sciences and humanities.

SPONSORS: This talk is part of the “Paul F. Lazarsfeld Lecture Series,” co-sponsored by the Columbia Center for Oral History (CCOH), the Oral History Master of Arts Program(OHMA), the Institute for the Study of Human Rights, and the Columbia Journalism School. Support from the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) is provided for programming that embodies late Professor Paul Lazarsfeld’s commitment to improving methodological approaches that address concerns of vital cultural and social significance.

INFORMATION: For more information, please email Terrell Frazier at terrellfrazier@columbia.edu

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

NO REGISTRATION REQUIRED