Tag Archives: 2014 Summer Institute

Wednesday, June 18 at 2pm: Love, Literature & Oral History: A Public Interview with Dr. Farah Griffin

Love, Literature and Oral History:
Transmitting our Stories

A Public Interview with Dr. Farah Jasmine Griffin

Farah GriffinThe Center for Oral History Research/INCITE (Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics) and the Institute for Research in African-American Studies presents a public interview with Dr. Farah Jasmine Griffin, William B. Ransford Professor of English & Comparative Literature and African American Studies, as a part of its 2014 Oral History Institute, “ Second Generation Memories and Stories.” The interview, which will focus on the power of love and the transmission of memory in African American communities, will be conducted by Janée Moses and Dr. Marcellus Blount will provide response.

WHEN: Wednesday, June 18, 2:00-4:30pm.

WHERE: Columbia University, Knox Hall, Room 509, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

Farah Jasmine Griffin is a professor of English and comparative literature and African American Studies at Columbia University, where she has served as director of the Institute for Research in African American studies. In addition to editing several collections of letters and essays she is the author of Who Set You Flowin’: The African American Migration Narrative (Oxford, 1995), If You Can’t Be Free, Be a Mystery: In Search of Billie Holiday (Free Press, 2001) and Clawing At the Limits of Cool: Miles Davis, John Coltrane, and the Greatest Jazz Collaboration Ever (Thomas Dunne, 2008).

Marcellus Blount, Professor of English and Comparative Literature and Co-Director of the Institute for Research in African-American Studies, teaches American and African American literary and cultural studies at Columbia University. He has been a Research Fellow at the Carter G. Woodson Institute at the University of Virginia, a Visiting Fellow at Wesleyan’s Center for Afro-American Studies, a Rockefeller Fellow at the Center for the Study of Black Literature and Culture at the University of Pennsylvania, and a Visiting Fellow at the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute at Harvard University. He has published essays in PMLA, Callaloo, American Literary History, and Southern Review. He co-edited Representing Black Men with George Cunningham. His first study is entitled “In a Broken Tongue: Rediscovering African American Poetry.” His current project is entitled Listening for My Name: African American Men and the Politics of Friendship. He was the Sterling Brown ’22 Visiting Professor of English at Williams College.

Janée A. Moses is a doctoral student at the University of Michigan in the American Culture Program. In May 2014, she earned a Master of Arts in Oral History from Columbia University. Her thesis, It matters whom she loves: An Oral History of the Life and Works of Amina Baraka, excavates the history of Black women participants of the Black Arts Movement and the importance of knowing whom they loved. In 2012, Moses earned a Bachelor of Arts in History from the University of Pennsylvania. Her research focuses on 20th century American cultural history, women’s history, African American history, gender studies, literary studies, and love. Oral history remains her primary method in pursuit of re-examining history in order to advance our understanding of the present.

INFORMATION: For more information, please email Terrell Frazier at terrellfrazier@columbia.edu or visit incite.columbia.edu.

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Public Screening and Conversation: One Generation’s Time: The Legacy of Silme Domingo & Gene Viernes

The Columbia Center for Oral History Research Presents
A Public Screening and Conversation:

One Generation’s Time: The Legacy of Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes

domingo-viernes1About: One Generation’s Time: The Legacy of Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes explores the legacy and impact of the work and lives of Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes, two Filipino-American activists and fishing cannery union members who were murdered for their involvement in union reform and workers’ rights activism.

WHEN: Tuesday, June 17, 6:00-8:00pm.

WHERE: Columbia University, Knox Hall, Room 509, 606 West 122nd Street, 5th floor. Campus Map.

MORE INFORMATION: Doors open at 6:00 p.m.; screening of the one-hour documentary starts at 6:10 p.m.; followed by a post-film discussion led by documentary co-producer Ron Chew and public historian and curator Jennifer Scott.

Ron Chew is the author of Remembering Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes: The Legacy of Filipino American Labor Activism. He served as executive director of the Wing Luke Asian Museum from 1991-2007. Known as an innovator using cutting-edge presentations with a locally oriented emphasis, Chew helped redefine museums by melding cultural identity, civic participation, and museum programs into a new tool in the fight for social justice.

Jennifer Scott is a Part-Time Professor at The New School for Public Engagement, Parsons School of Art and Design History and Theory, and Pratt Institute’s Graduate School of Arts and Cultural Management in New York, where she teaches courses in cultural anthropology, material culture, world heritage, museum studies, and cultural pluralism. Scott, most recently, served for ten years as the Vice-Director and Director of Research at Weeksville Heritage Center, a historic house museum specializing in innovative study and applications of history, culture, the arts and civic engagement.

For more information, please email Terrell Frazier at terrellfrazier[at]columbia.edu

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

 

APPLY: 2014 Summer Institute, Second Generation Memories and Stories

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE AND APPLY

The Center for Oral History Research and INCITE (Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics) are pleased to announce our 2014 Summer Institute, “Second Generation Memories and Stories,” to be held June 16-27, 2014 at Columbia University in New York City. The program will explore the ways in which memories are formed and transmitted through family, cultural, political and social frames and experiences. Oral history has been a central methodology in exploring global themes of identity and post-memory through second-generation stories of immigration, migration, poverty, trauma and genocide, displacement and exile. Oral history also provides a setting for intimate exchanges between families, communities and cultures in a way that preserves and secures local and indigenous knowledge across generations, cultures and ethnicities: engendering individual and social resilience.

We encourage applicants to use the Institute to explore a broad range of applications of second-generation oral history research in contemporary contexts and fields including public health and medicine, immigration studies (including the impact of post-9/11 US policies on immigrant communities), sociology and social science more generally. The program will include presentations on how scholars, museums and memorials have used second-generation oral histories, and testimony, in ways that are crucial to illuminating forgotten or misunderstood experiences. The Institute will also include practical workshops in digital storytelling, interviewing and editing.

Core faculty will include:• Mary Marshall Clark, Director of the Columbia Center for Oral History Research and co-director of the Oral History Master of Arts Program at the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics of Columbia University;

Peter Bearman, Director of the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics and co-director of the Oral History Master of Arts Program;

Doug Boyd, Director of the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries;

Alessandro Portelli, Professor of Anglo-American Literature at the University of Rome-La Sapienza;

Terrell Frazier, Director of Education and Outreach at the Columbia Center for Oral History;

Amy Starecheski, Associate Director of the Oral History Master of Arts Program at the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics of Columbia University;

Ronald J. Grele, Director Emeritus of the Columbia Center for Oral History;

Linda Shopes, Former President of the U.S. Oral History Association, Freelance Editor and Consultant in Oral and Public History.

• CCOHR staff, students from the Oral History Master of Arts Program (OHMA), and others who have worked in the archive will enrich our discussions with their interpretations.

Low-cost on-campus housing will be available for those outside of the New York City area.

Please contact Terrell Frazier with any questions.

http://incite.columbia.edu/summer-institute-ccohr/