Tag Archives: Taylor Krauss

TONIGHT: Interpretive Listening with Taylor Krauss, Summer Institute 2012

PLEASE JOIN US FOR

Interpretive Listening
Deconstructing the Language of Testimony 

WHO: Independent documentary filmmaker and human rights activist Taylor Krauss discusses documenting Rwandan genocide.

WHEN: Tuesday, June 12, 2011, 7:00-9:00pm.

WHERE: Columbia University Law School, Jerome Greene Annex, Morningside Heights Campus, 410 West 117th Street  NY, NY 10027. Enter campus at 116th Street, at either Broadway or Amsterdam. Google Map, Campus Map.

ABOUT THE PRESENTATION : The Columbia Center for Oral History krauss1will host Taylor Krauss, founder of Voices of Rwanda, as part of the 2012 Summer Institute. Krauss will discuss his work recording and preserving testimonies of Rwandans, ensuring that their stories inform the world about genocide and inspire a global sense of responsibility to prevent human rights atrocities.

Hear more about Taylor Krauss and his work in his own words:

SPONSORS: This presentation is a part of the Columbia Center for Oral History 2012 Summer Institute, “What is Remembered: Life Story Approaches in Human Rights Contexts,” co-sponsored by the Human Rights Institute (Columbia Law School).

Join Us at Public Events for Our 2012 Summer Institute!

CCOH 2012 Summer institute
“What is Remembered: Life Story Approaches in Human Rights Contexts”

MONDAY JUNE 4 — “ON TORTURE: A PUBLIC INTERVIEW WITH JAMEEL JAFFER”

Monday June 4, 6:00-8:00pm. Renown interviewer Ronald Grele interviews human rights and civil liberties attorney Jameel Jaffer in “On Torture: A Public Interview with Jameel Jaffer”

LOCATION: Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Annex, Morningside Heights Campus . Google Map, Campus Map.

Come watch the director emeritus of the Columbia Center for Oral History and one of the primary interviewers for the Rule of Law Oral History Project, Ronald Grele, interview human rights and civil liberties attorney and the Director of the ACLU’s Center for Democracy, Jameel Jaffer, about his litigating of ACLU v. Department of Defense, a FOIA lawsuit seeking records relating to the Bush administration’s torture program, his serving as a human rights monitor for the military commissions at Guantánamo, and his book, Administration of Torture: A Documentary Record from Washington to Abu Ghraib and Beyond.  MORE INFO HERE



TUESDAY JUNE 5 — “VIOLENCE AGAINST DISABLED WOMEN IN NEPAL”

Tuesday June 5, 4:15-5:30pm. Recipient of Australian Leadership Awards Scholarship and Lecturer at Tribhuvan University in Nepal, Neeti Khanal, will give a presentation focused on her recent work, entitled, “Violence Against Disabled Women in Nepal”

LOCATION: Columbia University, 203 Butler Library, Morningside Heights Campus. Campus Map.

Come listen to Neetie Khanal, Lecturer at the Central Department of Sociology/Anthropology at Tribhuvan University in Nepal and recipient of Australian Leadership Awards Scholarship, give a compelling presentation focused on her recent work, entitled, “Violence Against Disabled Women in Nepal” as well as her experiences interviewing disabled women survivors of violence. Her past work includes an examination of Maoist women’s experience in armed conflict in Nepal. MORE INFO HERE.



WEDNESDAY JUNE 6 — “EXAMING THE ROLE OF NARRATIVE IN HUMAN RIGHTS ADVOCACY, DOCUMENTATION AND JUSTICE- SEEKING”

Wednesday June 6, 6:00-8:00pm. Pamela Graham, Ramazan Aras, Michelle Brané, Sandra Coliver and Lisa Magarrell conduct a panel discussion “Examining the Role of Narrative in Human Rights Advocacy, Documentation and Justice- Seeking”

LOCATION: Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Annex, Morningside Heights Campus . Google Map, Campus Map.

Come participate in a panel discussion featuring Pamela Graham, Ramazan Aras, Michelle Brané, Sandra Coliver and Lisa Magarrell on the ethical, political and legal implications of using narrative, testimony and oral history in human rights contexts. Each panelist will explore how narrative connects informal and formal justice- seeking initiatives, and questions surrounding the use of narrative in pursuit of legal or political justice. MORE INFO HERE.



MONDAY JUNE 11 — “MIGRANT MUSIC IN ROME: THE NEW FOLK SOUNDS OF THE POSTCOLONIAL METROPOLIS”

Monday June 11, 5:00-7:00pm. Renown Oral historian and musicologist Alessandro Portelli will discuss his current fieldwork project “Migrant Music in Rome: The New Folk Sounds of the Postcolonial Metropolis”

LOCATION: Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Annex, Morningside Heights Campus. Google Map, Campus Map.

Come join us for an incredible public presentation by renowned oral historian and musicologist Alessandro Portelli about his current fieldwork project of collecting the music in Rome brought by multicultural migrants during the past 20 years as he notes on how it has changed the ethnic, linguistic and cultural make-up of postcolonial Italy.



TUESDAY JUNE 12 —

 “INTERPRETIVE LISTENING: DECONSTRUCTING THE LANGUAGE OF TESTIMONY”

Tuesday June 12, 7:00-9:00pm. Independent documentary filmmaker and Voices of Rwanda founder Taylor Krauss will discuss his work recording and preserving testimonies of Rwandans, in “Interpretive Listening: Deconstructing the Language of Testimony”

LOCATION: Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Annex, Morningside Heights Campus. Google Map, Campus Map.

Come be a part of a public presentation by independent documentary filmmaker and Voices of Rwanda founder Taylor Krauss as he discusses his work recording and preserving testimonies of Rwandans, ensuring that their stories inform the world about genocide and inspire a global sense of responsibility to prevent human rights atrocities.

Announcing the CCOH 2012 Summer Institute

The Columbia Center for Oral History is proud to announce its 2012 Summer Institute, “What is Remembered: Life Story Approaches in Human Rights Contexts,” to be held June 4-15, 2012 at Columbia University in New York City. Sessions will explore the methodological and theoretical implications of doing life story research with individuals who have suffered human rights abuses and other forms of discrimination. The institute will focus on the role of oral history in documenting such histories, but also interpreting the strategies of resistance and survival of creative individuals and communities that have lived through difficult times.

General themes of the institute will include: the challenges of doing fieldwork in post-conflict societies, including remembrance of personal violence; the uses of oral sources in expressing emotion and facilitating constructive actions; and the uses of informal and official forms of life histories in addressing the tensions between individual and collective remembering. The Institute will also include practical workshops in digital storytelling, interviewing and editing.

Core faculty will include:

· Mary Marshall Clark, Director of the Columbia Center for Oral History and co-director of the Oral History Master of Arts Program at the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy of Columbia University;

· Alessandro Portelli, Professor of Anglo-American literature at the University of Rome-La Sapienza;

· Representatives from the Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada;

· Taylor Krauss, Executive Director of Voices of Rwanda;

· Douglas Boyd, Director of the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries;

· Ronald J. Grele, Director Emeritus of the Columbia Center for Oral History.

CCOH staff, students from the Oral History Master of Arts Program (OHMA), and others who have worked in the archive will enrich our discussions with their interpretations.

The application form is available here [pdf].

Completed applications and supporting documentation should be e-mailed to: ccohsummerinstitute@libraries.cul.columbia.edu.

Low-cost on-campus housing will be available for those outside of the New York City area.

ORAL HISTORY OPEN HOUSE AND TALK: Tuesday, October 25 AT COLUMBIA

Oral History Graphic 2

To Document, To Change, or To Listen: Testimony’s Unplanned Impact

WHO: Independent documentary filmmaker and human rights activist Taylor Krauss discusses documenting Rwandan genocide. Staff will be on hand to talk with prospective students about the Oral History Master of Arts (OHMA) program!

WHEN: Tuesday, October 25, 2011, 6:00-8:00pm.

WHERE: Columbia University, International Affairs Building, Room 801. Enter campus at 116th Street, at either Broadway or Amsterdam. MAP

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP : The Oral History Master of Artskrauss1 program, Columbia Center for Oral History, and the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy will host Taylor Krauss, founder of Voices of Rwanda, as part of the Oral History Seminar Series. Krauss will discuss his work recording and preserving testimonies of Rwandans, ensuring that their stories inform the world about genocide and inspire a global sense of responsibility to prevent human rights atrocities. He will also share the unplanned impact that creating a space for documenting memories had at the local level in Rwanda, as well as within the survivor community.

There will also be a presentation from faculty and alumni about the Oral History Master of Arts (OHMA), a multi-disciplinary program that utilizes theoretical approaches across the social sciences and humanities.

Hear more about Taylor Krauss and his work in his own words:

SPONSORS: This talk is part of the “Oral History Workshop Public Lecture Series,” co-sponsored by the Columbia Center for Oral History (CCOH), and the Oral History Master of Arts Program (OHMA). OHMA is supported by the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy (ISERP).