Author Archives: Columbia Rare Book & Manuscript Library

NYPD Guardians Oral History Collection Open for Research

The NYPD Guardians Oral History Collection is complemented by the Charles Coleman Collection of The Guardians Association Newsletters, where the pictured materials can be found. (“Felon Sneakers” images from Box 1, Folder 6; “Family Tree” in Box 1, Folder 9; “25th Dinner-Dance” in Box 2, Folder 83; “37th Dinner Dance” from Box 2 Folder 85)

The Columbia Center for Oral History Archives at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library is pleased to announce that a finding aid is now available for the New York Police Department Guardians Oral History Collection. The oral history project was initiated by Liz Strong in 2015 while she was studying in the Oral History Master of Arts program at Columbia.

The collection’s fourteen interviews document the experiences of members of the NYPD Guardians, a fraternal organization for African American police officers and civilian employees of the NYPD. Over the decades, the organization has served members by developing community; providing education and mentorship; advocating within the department; and taking legal action to combat discrimination in hiring and promotion. Interviewees discuss the impact of the Guardians on officers’ careers, the group’s advocacy against discrimination in the NYPD, and developments in police work from the 1960s-2010s. As a result of the oral history project, interviewee Charles Coleman also donated a collection of newsletters and other ephemera to the library. These materials are also open for research at the RBML.

Transcripts can be viewed in the RBML reading room. The audio of the interview is also available in the RBML reading room by emailing the CCOH Archives at oralhist@library.columbia.edu two days in advance of your visit. For more information about the NYPD Guardians Oral History Collection, planning a visit to the RBML, or the oral history collections more generally, please contact oralhist@library.columbia.edu.

-David A. Olson, Archivist for the Columbia Center for Oral History Archives

New Al Jaffee Oral History Open to Research

In new interview, Al Jaffee discusses his work for MAD, including the “Snappy Answers to Stupid Questions” feature. (Artwork from Al Jaffee papers, soon to be available for research at RBML)

The Columbia Center for Oral History Archives at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library is pleased to announce that an oral history interview with Mad magazine cartoonist Al Jaffee is now available for research. This interview was taken for the CCOH Archives by Suzanne Snider in 2016 to complement archival materials from Al Jaffee already available at the RBML and those to become available in the future.

In this interview, Jaffee describes his youth, his experiences at MAD, his work methods, and his theories on humor, among other topics.

The transcript can be viewed in the RBML reading room. The audio of the interview is also available in the RBML reading room by emailing the CCOH Archives at oralhist@library.columbia.edu two days in advance of your visit. For more information about comics collections at the RBML, please contact Karen Green, Curator for Comics and Cartoons (klg19@columbia.edu). For more information about the Al Jaffee oral history interview, planning a visit to the RBML, or the oral history collections more generally, please contact oralhist@library.columbia.edu.

-David A. Olson, Archivist for the Columbia Center for Oral History Archives

1962: Connecting Amiri Baraka, Angus MacLise and La Monte Young in Recent Additions

Cover of audio reel from the Amiri Baraka Papers (Box 91)

 

A recent acquisition by Karla Nielsen, Curator of Literature, of material relating to La Monte Young and Angus MacLise from Kenneth Mallory Booksellers coincides with a unique, historical audio recording discovered recently in the Amiri Baraka Papers (pictured above).  The set of 1964 concert posters for La Monte Young’s performing ensemble, then consisting of John Cale, Tony Conrad, and Marian Zazeela, represent the beginnings of The Tortoise His Dreams and Journeys, a well-known yet sparsely publicly-documented work by Young and the Theater of Eternal Music that came to be a musical turning point for Young and his colleagues.

Even more obscure than The Tortoise are the precursors to that work, yet a moldy audio reel box discovered in the papers of Amiri Baraka with the inscription “La Monte Young Concert August 26, 1962” came to light during digital preservation of the collection’s audio-visual materials.   With the help of Jung Hee Choi, friend and collaborator of La Monte Young, we were able to identify more exactly what the contents reflect.

The tortoise recalling the drone of the holy numbers as they were revealed in the dreams of the whirlwind & the obsidian gong & illuminated by the sawmill, the green saw-tooth ocelot & the high-tension line stepdown transformer : [advertisement]. Call number: ML45 .P63 1964g. ML45 .P63 1964g

The concert took place August 26, 1962  at 10-4 Group Gallery, 73 Fourth Avenue, New York, NY and was titled “26 VIII 62 Evening NYC.”  The ensemble consisted of La Monte Young, Soprano Saxophone; Angus MaClise, Hand Drums; Marian Zazeela, Voice Drone; Billy Linich (later Billy Name), Voice Drone.  The pieces they presented in this concert were [Untitled].  La Monte wrote of the program, “These pieces were evolved during the daily rehearsals of my Theatre of Eternal Music over the period from Spring 1962 until the inception of The Tortoise in the Winter of 1964. The work of this period involved static permutation techniques of my own design applied to constellations of pitches over various stationary and movable drone combinations.”

While the box containing the tape indicates an hour of music, in fact there is not much more than ten minutes worth of the concert reflected on the tape.  The majority of the tape consists of an extended interview with saxophonist Archie Shepp.  We could presume that at that time, when La Monte was primarily playing saxophone in the group rather than singing alongside Marian, Amiri Baraka saw a common interest in the two musicians with a more direct association than would be obvious today.  Beyond just conceptually overlapping for Baraka, it also appears that the Shepp interview is recorded over the missing minutes of the La Monte Young concert on the tape.

The second portion of the recent acquisition is an addition to our existing collection of Angus MacLise Papers. MacLise, who plays hand drums on the August 26, 1962 concert recording aforementioned, in 1962 also published an alternative calendar entitled Year.  Previously not well-represented in our MacLise collection, our 2017 Addition now includes several typed and handwritten manuscripts and revisions for Year, as well as correspondence, around the publication.  The MacLise Year calendar, since its publication, has maintained interest in the avant-garde music and poetry communities, and there is even a Twitter feed (@MacLiseYEAR) which bills itself as a day-by-day recitation of the work.

Tom McCutchon, Public Services Specialist

Note in MacLise’s hand, affixed to “YEAR” manuscript in the 2017 Additions to Angus MacLise Papers.

 

 

 

 

Codex Conquest

Did you ever wish you could collect rare books? In the game Codex Conquest: The Game of Book History, YOU are the curator for a national collection, acquiring books from the 15th century onward while completing with other countries for the greatest collection, and contending with events that impact your library (fires, donations) along the way.

On April 24th and 25th, Amy Hildreth Chen, Special Collections Instruction Librarian at the University of Iowa and creator of Codex Conquest, will be coming to Columbia to discuss the game creation process and demonstrate the game at multiple sessions. On Monday, April 24th, there will be three sessions of game play and a workshop on alternative methods of teaching hosted by the Center for Teaching and Learning. On April 25, we will discuss customization of the game, including a demonstration of a version tailored to Jewish book history. See below for dates, times, and locations.

Co-sponsored by the Rare Book & Manuscript Library and the Global Studies Division of the Columbia University Libraries, in partnership with the Columbia Center for Teaching and Learning, and Footprints: Jewish Books Through Time and Place.

Registration information:

Please use the links below to register. You are welcome to register for multiple sessions, but must register for each session separately. The CTL pedagogy and gaming workshop is for faculty and graduate student instructors, and requires separate registration.

Monday, April 24:

9:30 AM -12:30 PM   Butler Library Room 523
Codex Conquest: The Game of Book History, Game 1

Register with Your UNI
Register as a Guest

12:30 – 2:00 PM   Butler Library Room 212

CTL Workshop: Using Games to Engage Students and Enhance their Learning
Register with Your UNI

2:00 – 5:00 PM  Butler Library Room 523
Codex Conquest: The Game of Book History, Game 2
Register with Your UNI
Register as a Guest

6:00 – 8:45 PM   Butler Library Room 523
Codex Conquest: The Game of Book History, Game 3
Register with Your UNI
Register as a Guest

Tuesday, April 25:

9:30 AM – noon  Studio@Butler (2nd floor, Butler Library)
Customizing Codex Conquest: The Game of Book History (Jewish Edition)
Register with Your UNI
Register as a Guest

Phoenix House Oral History Collection Ready for Research

The Phoenix House Oral History Collection joins other resources at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library regarding addiction and controlled substances. The images above are from pamphlets found in the Carnegie Corporation Of New York Records (CCNY III.B, Box 48, Folder 48.4)

 

The Columbia Center for Oral History Archives at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library is pleased to announce that a finding aid is now available for the Phoenix House Foundation Oral History Collection. These interviews were taken between 2014 and 2015 by the archives’ partner, the Columbia Center for Oral History Research.

Since 1967, Phoenix House has been a prominent institution in the treatment of addiction. The collection’s narrators include Phoenix House founders, former residents, employees (resident directors, regional directors, clinical directors, public relations professionals, directors of human services, and more), and collaborators such as journalists, politicians, philanthropists, legal counsel, and public servants. They discuss the origins and growth of the organization, the therapeutic community model of addiction treatment, and changes at the organization over the years.

Please contact oralhist@library.columbia.edu for more information about accessing the materials at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Digital transcripts and audio for the collection can also be accessed through the website of Columbia Center for Oral History Research.

-David A. Olson, Archivist for the Columbia Center for Oral History Archives

Animal Advocates Oral History Collection Finding Aid Now Available

All images from attachments to interviews in the Animal Advocates Oral History Collection. Sources, from left to right: Box 7 (Margaret "Peggy" Moreland Stathos Attachments); Box 1 (Theodora Capaldo Attachments); Box 1 (Theodora Capaldo Attachments); Box 6 (Jim Mason Attachments).

All images from attachments to interviews in the Animal Advocates Oral History Collection. Sources, from left to right: Box 7 (Margaret “Peggy” Moreland Stathos Attachments); Box 1 (Theodora Capaldo Attachments); Box 1 (Theodora Capaldo Attachments); Box 6 (Jim Mason Attachments).

 

The Columbia Center for Oral History Archives at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library is pleased to announce that a finding aid is now available for the Animal Advocates Oral History Collection.

The collection’s fourteen interviews were conducted between 1999 and 2004 to document the activities of individuals and organizations that had fought for the protection of animals in the preceding decades. The 1970s and 1980s saw the publication of groundbreaking books, new articulations of ethical frameworks, and increased national publicity for animal rights and protection. The project was undertaken by the non-profit organization Recording Animal Advocacy as the movement entered a more introspective phase in the 1990s, and members began asking questions about their past that traditional archival sources did not readily address. The interviews are a unique resource on activists’ views on animal shelters, opposition to vivisection and scientific testing on animals, vegetarianism and veganism, the treatment of agricultural animals, and environmentalism.

Please contact oralhist@library.columbia.edu for more information about the collection and accessing the materials.

-David A. Olson, Archivist for the Columbia Center for Oral History Archives

After Processing, Scholarship Begins: Research Applications of the Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program Records

On September 30, the Rare Book and Manuscript Library’s three-year project to process the Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program Records will officially come to an end.  The project, supported by the Ford Foundation, met several goals.  It supported the processing of approximately 500 linear feet of paper records and 3.6 terabytes of digital records, which are now open to researchers at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library.  It facilitated the development of necessary infrastructure for accessioning, processing, and providing access to the rapidly increasing amount of born-digital materials in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library’s archival collections.  Finally, to encourage scholarly engagement with the Ford IFP Records, it permitted RBML to host a group of six international visiting scholars who conducted extensive research using the collection over the summer and presented their findings in a symposium titled “Education, Development, and Social Justice: the Legacy of the Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program.”

A complete video recording of the first panel of the symposium is now available on Columbia University’s YouTube channel, and video of the second panel is forthcoming.  Sean Quimby, Director of the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, welcomed attendees.   Joan Dassin, IFP’s Executive Director and Professor of International Education and Development at Brandeis University, opened the event with a keynote address reflecting on the experience of designing and administering IFP, as well as preserving its records.  Next, Rajika Bhandari of the Institute of International Education moderated the symposium’s first panel, “Global Perspectives.”   Patricia L. Rosenfield of the Rockefeller Archive Center moderated its second panel, “Local Contexts,” and Kay Lee of the Ford Foundation gave closing remarks.

Joan Dassin, Executive Director of the Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program, delivers the keynote address at "Education, Development, and Social Justice: the Legacy of the Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program," a symposium hosted by the Rare Book and Manuscript Library on September 8.

Joan Dassin, Executive Director of the Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program, delivers the keynote address at “Education, Development, and Social Justice: the Legacy of the Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program,” a symposium hosted by the Rare Book and Manuscript Library on September 8.

 

The Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program supported graduate studies for individuals in 23 developing countries between 2001 and 2013.  Its model prioritized social commitment over traditional selection criteria.  In addition to academic and leadership potential, Fellows were selected from groups and communities who lack systematic access to higher education. These groups included women, indigenous people, people with disabilities, and people from rural areas, as well as other groups identified as marginalized within specific regional and national contexts.  According to the Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program Website—which is no longer live, but was archived as part of RBML’s processing project –these selection criteria also allowed IFP to function as an experiment through which the international community could “derive lessons about educational access, academic excellence and the ways in which equity-based scholarship programs could have a positive impact on individuals, institutions and communities.”  As such, extensive program evaluation was carried out throughout IFP’s duration.  A longitudinal Alumni Tracking Study carried out by the Institute of International Education will also continue until 2023, in order to more thoroughly document and study the program’s long-term effects on its alumni and their communities.

The experimental nature of IFP, as well as the thoroughness with which it was documented, gives the Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program Records multifaceted and enduring research value.  As the visiting scholars demonstrated, the Ford IFP Records contain information useful to researchers working within a broad range of disciplines and approaches.  Some of the records’ applications are highlighted below, in video clips from the symposium.

Wim de Jong, a Dutch historian and political philosopher at Radboud University Nijmegen, specializes in the history of democracy and its connection to education.  His presentation, “Between Global and Local:  The International Fellowships Program Archives and the Training of Social Justice Leaders (2001-2013)” examined IFP’s work to define leadership and social justice as universally applicable concepts, and its relationship to the structure and approach of IFP overall.

Budi Waluyo, an IFP Indonesia alumnus and Ph.D. candidate in International and Comparative Education at Lehigh University, specializes in teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL).  He presented “Measuring National Community Development Returns from International Scholarship Programs:  A Case Study of the International Fellowships Program.”  This presentation analyzed the impact of IFP through the theoretical frameworks of Human Capital, Social Capital Renewal, and Cultural Capital, using data sets from the Ford IFP Records.

Budi Waluyo presents his work at the Columbia University symposium as Wim de Jong (left) and Oluwafunmilayo Para-Mallam (right) look on.

Budi Waluyo presents his work at the Columbia University symposium as Wim de Jong (left) and Oluwafunmilayo Para-Mallam (right) look on.

 

Rajendran T. Govender, an IFP South Africa alumnus, is the director of the Kwa-Zulu Natal Department of Arts and Culture.  In “From Dark to Enlightened Continent:  An Analytical Study of the Research of the Ford Foundation IFP Africa Alumni from 2001 to 2013,” he presented the results of a quantitative and qualitative analysis of African and Middle Eastern IFP alumni.  Govender’s quantitative data sample was gathered from the Ford IFP Records, and his qualitative data was gathered through a survey distributed to the same alumni.

Oluwafunmilayo Para-Mallam is an IFP Nigeria alumna and a professor of gender and development at the National Institute for Policy and Strategic Studies, Kuru, Nigeria.  Her presentation, “Gender-Based Violence in Sub-Saharan Africa:  An Integrative Review,” analyzed studies related to gender-based violence conducted by IFP alumni from sub-Saharan Africa.  Through this analysis, she identified strategies for reducing gender-based violence from those studies which are applicable to the current Nigerian context.

Nagah Sayed-Ahmed, an IFP Egypt alumna, is an independent social science researcher and activist who studies the relationship between modernity and political Islam in Egypt.  Her presentation, “Ford Foundation IFP Impact on Social Justice:  Some Evidence from Egypt,” examined the impact of IFP’s emphasis on social justice leadership on Egyptian IFP alumni.

Thy Tran presents her analysis of IFP Vietnam alumni theses.

Thy Tran presents her analysis of IFP Vietnam alumni theses.

 

The final presentation in the symposium was given by Tran Nu Mai Thy, an IFP Vietnam and Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs alumna.  Tran analyzed theses by IFP Vietnam alumni from the Ford IFP Records for evidence of the relationship between alumni scholarship and the program’s vision.  She also identified information about how these theses, which very often incorporated local case studies, impacted their authors’ communities.

Submitted by Celeste Brewer, Ford IFP Project Archivist

 

In Her Words: A Celebration and Reflection on the Completion of the IRWGS Oral History Project

Images found in the Columbia University Archives’ Historical Subject Files: Left to right, Box 260, Folder 6; Box 261, Folder 13; Box 261, Folder 13; Box 260, Folder 8; Box 261, Folder 13.

Images found in the Columbia University Archives’ Historical Subject Files: Left to right, Box 260, Folder 6; Box 261, Folder 13; Box 261, Folder 13; Box 260, Folder 8; Box 261, Folder 13.

 

In 2012, Columbia University’s Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality (IRWGS) celebrated its 25th anniversary. As part of that celebration, the Institute decided to record its history by collaborating with the Columbia Center for Oral History Research (CCOHR) to collect interviews with 36 individuals—scholars, administrators, and students—who have been involved with the organization since its founding in 1987. Using oral history methodology, the project allows its narrators to reflect on their lives and experiences in their own voices—symbolically significant to the women who struggled to build careers in fields that habitually denied them that right, even within the walls of their own academic institutions. The Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality Oral History Collection is available for research at the Columbia Center for Oral History Archives, and a finding aid is now available to help researchers explore the interviews.

In this collection, you’ll come across the voice of Patricia Williams, who was one of only ten black women in her Harvard Law School graduating class. You’ll listen to Gayatri Spivak, who earned her bachelor’s degree at 17, was tenured at 28, and became the first woman of color to achieve the title of University Professor, the highest faculty rank at Columbia. You’ll find Robert Hanning, who allied himself with his female colleagues and boldly chose to publicize his salary to illustrate the gender inequity of faculty pay. You’ll find Lila Abu-Lughod, who strove to internationalize feminist conversations with her renowned post-9/11 essay, “Do Muslim Women Really Need Saving?” You’ll find Greg Pflugfelder, whose pioneering focus on sexuality studies and queer history helped broaden the intersectionality of IRWGS with the addition of an ‘S’ for ‘sexuality’ to its name. And you’ll find the incredible narratives of so many others, each uniquely distinguishable in tone, experience, and position, but which overlap in time, place, and circumstance; these individual narratives become intertwined in networks of intellectual collaboration, activism, and female mentorship to give form to the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality.

Because oral history relies on the enlightening nature of hindsight, it serves as an exceptional tool for remembering time past. Yet it can also provide opportunities for a renewed examination of the present, provoking valuable conversation between generations. Thus, while all narrators reflect on previous years—their childhoods, their early years in academia, the struggles of their careers, and those who hurt and helped them along the way—many also addressed the present through the lens of their past, and vice versa. Farah Griffin, who teaches in the Department of English and Comparative Literature and specializes in African American literature, speaks about the generation she currently teaches—my own. My generation, she points out, who came of age in a world where a black man could be elected president and then, as a given, re-elected. My generation, who grew up with Beyoncé and mainstream conversations about feminism. My generation, who could be shocked by the injustice of the Trayvon Martin murder and verdict in a way that Griffin was not. My generation, who can ponder not just questions about the necessity of women’s colleges in 2016, but can confidently continue the conversation, with more participants and a bigger audience than ever, about the definition of womanhood itself. Griffin reflects on this:

There has been a resurgence in the level of activism, not just around racial justice and criminal justice, but also the young people who are organizing around sexual violence. They’re upset and they’re hurt, deeply hurt and deeply angry, and rightly so, but to me it is so beautiful. You know? They bring tears to my eyes, because it’s a level of activism and a willingness to put their bodies on the line that I have not seen. It’s not about nostalgia for a moment that they didn’t live in. They are living in this moment, and that’s something…they decided to step up and organize. Those of us who are feminists feel sometimes like, oh God, what happened? All these young women who think feminism is a dirty word… And then, boom! Here they are, creating their own and standing on their own and insisting on their own. Their institutions are not going to tolerate sexual violence. They are not going to just take mass incarceration for granted. They can change their institution. The fact that they have to do it is disheartening. The fact that they are doing it, to me, is just extraordinary. I’m just so grateful that I got to witness them.
As Griffin acknowledges, there is still work to be done, but by listening to these voices, we can engage in our history and learn about yesterday while applying it to our conversations today. Perhaps the most significant contribution of oral histories is not its preservation of the past but the dialogue it creates for our future. This project records and gives power to often marginalized voices by allowing them to craft and take control over their own narratives. The power and wisdom in their words can inspire action—all we have to do is listen.

The full collection can be explored by visiting the Rare Book & Manuscript Library on the 6th floor of Columbia University’s Butler Library. Please contact the Columbia Center for Oral History Archives for more information. Certain interviews can also be seen on the website of the archives’ partner center, Columbia Center for Oral History Research at INCITE.

– Rebecca Breslaw and Kelsey Decker

About the authors: Rebecca Breslaw is a senior at Barnard College majoring in Anthropology and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Kelsey Decker is a junior at Barnard College majoring in Sociology. Both Kelsey and Becca are student employees at the Columbia Center for Oral History Archives and wrote interview summaries for the IRWGS finding aid.

Pulitzer Prize Centennial Exhibition

pulitzer-prize-2

In honor of the centennial of the Pulitzer Prizes, Columbia’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library (RBML) presents “The Pulitzer Prizes: From Julia Ward Howe to Hamilton, A Selective Look at 100 Years of Excellence,” on display in the Kempner Gallery, RBML, Butler Library, 6th Floor, East from September 12 through December 23, 2016.

RBML is the repository of the successful Pulitzer Prize submissions, and material from a wide variety of prize categories are on display, beginning with the first winners in 1917 and running through 2016. These include Julia Ward Howe, the first award for biography, given to Laura Richards and Maude Howe Elliot; the first award for reporting, given to Herbert Bayard Swope of The New York World for his series of articles entitled “Inside the German Empire;” and the most recent award for drama, given to Lin-Manuel Miranda for Hamilton: The Revolution in 2016.

Rare Book and Manuscript Library’s First Visiting Scholars Consult Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program Records

Rajendran T. Govender of the Kwazulu-Natal Department of Arts and Culture, South Africa, and Nagah Sayed-Ahmed, an independent social science researcher and activist from Egypt, consult the paper records of the Ford IFP Archive in the reading room at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library.

Rajendran T. Govender of the Kwazulu-Natal Department of Arts and Culture, South Africa, and Nagah Sayed-Ahmed, an independent social science researcher and activist from Egypt, consult the paper records of the Ford IFP Archive in the reading room at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library.

 

The Rare Book and Manuscript Library achieved a milestone this summer, sponsoring its first group of international visiting scholars in connection with the opening of the Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program Records.  The six scholars, visiting from institutions around the world, have spent the summer conducting intensive research using the paper and digital components of the Ford IFP Archive. They are an interdisciplinary group, with interests including development studies, international education, arts and culture, and the history of philanthropy.  The visiting scholars’ findings will contribute to the growing body of scholarship on the impact of educational fellowship programs such as Ford IFP on sustainable international development.

The scholars’ names and project titles are as follows:

  • Tran Nu Mai Thy (Endicott College), “IFP Vision through the Lens of Vietnamese Alumni: An Analysis of Theses”
  • Budi Waluyo (Lehigh University), “Measuring National Community Development Returns from International Scholarship Programs”
  • Wim de Jong (Radboud University Nijmegen, Netherlands), “Philanthropy, Community and Democracy. The Ford Foundation’s Domestic and Foreign Education Programs, 1949-2016”
  • Oluwafunmilayo Para-Mallam (National Institute for Policy & Strategic Studies, Nigeria), “Tackling Gender-Based Violence in Select African Countries”
  • Rajendran Thangavelu Govender (Kwazulu-Natal Department of Arts and Culture, South Africa) “From Dark to Enlightened Continent—An Analytical Study of the Research of the Ford Foundation IFP Africa Alumni from 2001 to 2013”
  • Nagah Sayed-Ahmed, independent social science researcher and activist, “Promoting Social Justice in Egypt: the Impact of the Ford IFP”
Wim de Jong of Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands, pauses to review his notes after examining a box of paper records from the Ford IFP Archive.

Wim de Jong of Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands, pauses to review his notes after examining a box of paper records from the Ford IFP Archive.

 

The Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program, supported by the largest single grant in the history of the Ford Foundation, took place between 2001 and 2012.  During this time, it sponsored graduate education for over 4,300 Fellows from developing countries who lacked systematic access to higher education, but were committed to furthering social justice and sustainable development in their communities.  The Ford IFP Archive was transferred to the Rare Book and Manuscript Library in 2012.  It contains approximately 500 linear feet of paper records and 3.6 terabytes of digital files documenting the planning and administration of the Ford IFP, as well as the selection, placement, and monitoring of Fellows studying at universities on five continents.  The archive is currently open to researchers, with processing anticipated to be completed by the end of the year.  The digital archive’s components are also available online at the Ford IFP Archive’s website.

The visiting scholars will present their findings at a symposium, “Education, Development, and Social Justice:  the Legacy of the Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program,” at Columbia’s Faculty House on September 8.  Registration for interested attendees is available online via the Columbia University Libraries Events Calendar.

Submitted by Celeste Brewer, Ford IFP Project Archivist