Tag Archives: Book History Colloquium

Book History Colloquium: Panel on Handmade Books, Remade Genres

 

 

Rachel Feder, "Marginal Experiments"

Ellen Gruber Garvey, "Repurposed Books"

Karen Sánchez-Eppler, "Beyond the Press of History"

 

October 10, 2013 (Thursday)

 

Butler Library, Room 523 at 6:00 p.m.

 

This panel brings together three scholars who work on 19th-century American and British handmade books. In “Marginal Experiments”, Rachel Fader will explore the connections between nineteenth-century women’s daily writing and the history of experimental poetry. “Beyond the Press of History” focuses on manuscript-books that strive to record their historical moment (by Edward Hitchcock, George Templeton Strong, William Dorsey, and Vincente Pérez Rosales) and shows how attention to manuscript-books can open a more expansive model of national narrative and national belonging.

Rachel Feder is a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of English at Rutgers University. Rachel’s current research focuses on nineteenth-century commonplace books, book history, and experimental poetics.  Ellen Gruber Garvey’s most recent book, Writing with Scissors: American Scrapbooks from the Civil War to the Harlem Renaissance came out from Oxford University Press in 2013.  Prof. Gruber Garvey, a Professor of English at New Jersey City University, is also the author of The Adman in the Parlor: Magazines and the Gendering of Consumer Culture (OUP, 1996), which received a SHARP Prize for Best Book. Karen Sánchez-Eppler is L. Stanton Williams 1941 Professor of American Studies and English at Amherst College.  The author of Touching Liberty: Abolition, Feminism and the Politics of the Body (1993) and Dependent States: The Child’s Part in Nineteenth-Century American Culture (2005), she is currently working on two book projects The Unpublished Republic: Manuscript Cultures of the Mid-Nineteenth Century U.S. and In the Archives of Childhood: Personal and Historical Pasts.

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The Book History Colloquium at Columbia University, open to any discipline, aims to provide a broad outlet for the scholarly discussion of book history, print culture, the book arts, and bibliographical research, and (ideally) the promotion of research and publication in these fields. Our presenters include Columbia faculty members and advanced graduate students, and scholars of national prominence from a range of institutions.

Questions? Email Karla Nielsen.

All sessions take place 6pm in 523 Butler Library, Columbia Morningside Campus, unless otherwise noted.

Book History Colloquium: “How to Read Books Doing Things in Imperial Rome”

Joseph Howley

Assistant Professor of Classics, Columbia University

 

September 26, 2013 (Thursday)

Butler Library, Room 523 at 6:00 p.m.

Between the Alexandrian aesthetics of the poetic book roll and the modern values of the industrially printed codex lies the world of  the Roman book.  This talk examines some uses of the material text in Roman prose authors such as Seneca the Elder, Suetonius, and Aulus Gellius, including its use as a weapon, its subjection to destruction, and its relationship to speech and thought, to explore how Romans imagined the book as a  technology and force in their world.

Joseph Howley works on the intellectual culture of the Roman Empire, processes of mediation in the Roman Imperial world, problems of miscellany and other quasi-literary forms, and the ancient and modern history of the book. He is currently preparing a book on Noctes Atticae of Aulus Gellius, exploring the way Gellius’s neglected work frames, narrates, and prompts processes of critical and self-aware learning in the context of second-century Rome.

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The Book History Colloquium at Columbia University, open to any discipline, aims to provide a broad outlet for the scholarly discussion of book history, print culture, the book arts, and bibliographical research, and (ideally) the promotion of research and publication in these fields. Our presenters include Columbia faculty members and advanced graduate students, and scholars of national prominence from a range of institutions.

Questions? Email Karla Nielsen.

All sessions take place 6pm in 523 Butler Library, Columbia Morningside Campus, unless otherwise noted.

Thursday, April 18th– Book History Colloquium: “Translating the Enlightenment: The Publisher as Cultural Intermediary” with Jeffrey Freedman

Freedman

The last third of the eighteenth century was a period of remarkable creativity in the world of German letters, a period historians associate with such famous authors as Lessing, Kant, and Goethe. At that time, however, German works were practically unknown outside of Germany unless translated into French, the universal language of educated Europeans. This paper will show how the (mainly Swiss) publishers who translated German works adapted their translations for an international public of French-readers that stretched from Dublin to Moscow.

Jeffrey Freedman is Associate Professor of History at Yeshiva University and the author of A Poisoned Chalice (Princeton University Press, 2002) and Books Without Borders in Enlightenment Europe: French Cosmopolitanism and German Literary Markets (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012).

The Book History Colloquium at Columbia University, open to any discipline, aims to provide a broad outlet for the scholarly discussion of book history, print culture, the book arts, and bibliographical research, and (ideally) the promotion of research and publication in these fields. Our presenters include Columbia faculty members and advanced graduate students, and scholars of national prominence from a range of institutions.

Questions? Email Karla Nielsen.

This session takes place in 523 Butler Library, 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.

Thursday, March 28th– Book History Colloquium: “Amiable with Big Teeth: Discovering Claude McKay’s Long Lost Novel”

Speakers: Jean-Christophe Cloutier and Brent Edwards

Location: 523 Butler Library, 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.

 
In 2009, the complete typescript of Amiable with Big Teeth, a previously unknown novel by Claude McKay written in 1941, was discovered in Columbia University’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library.  In anticipation of the novel’s publication, this talk covers the story of its unexpected discovery, and recounts the years of archival research that led to its successful authentication. In addition, it will contextualize the novel’s composition, and consider its implications for our understanding of McKay and the “aftermath” of the Harlem Renaissance. The bound typescript’s location in the papers of Samuel Roth, the man who notoriously published unauthorized excerpts of Joyce’s Ulysses in the late 1920s, also suggestively links McKay’s fate to that of high modernism.
 

Jean-Christophe Cloutier is a graduate student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, where he also works as an archival intern since 2009. His dissertation, “Archival Vagabonds: Twentieth-Century American Fiction and the Archive in Novelistic Practice”, explores the interplay between the archival and aesthetic sensibilities of twentieth-century novelists.
 
Brent Hayes Edwards is a Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature and the Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia. He is the author of the prize-winning study The Practice of Diaspora: Literature, Translation, and the Rise of Black Internationalism (Harvard UP, 2003), which was awarded the John Hope Franklin Prize of the American Studies Association and the Gilbert Chinard prize of the Society for French Historical Studies.

Book History Colloquium: “The Golden Age of Theatrical Scrapbooks, 1880-1930”

Sharon Marcus,

Orlando Harriman Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University

 

December 3, 2012 (Monday)

Butler Library, Room 523 from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

 

 

Theatrical scrapbooks are some of the least utilized documents in theater history archives, yet also among the most useful, replete with cast lists, advertising imagery, ticket stubs, theater programs, seating charts, and clippings of reviews and articles.  This talk provides a history of the theatrical scrapbook in the United States during the golden age of theater, 1880-1930, as well as a formal analysis of the traits that define theatrical scrapbooks as a genre distinct from other kinds of albums popular during the nineteenth century.  These materials illuminate a few key problems in theater studies, including the status of the dramatic author; the relationship between theater and film; and the notoriously elusive bond between stars and fans, actors and audiences.

 

Sharon Marcus is the author of Apartment Stories: City and Home in Nineteenth-Century Paris and London (1999) and Between Women: Friendship, Desire, and Marriage in Victorian England (2007), which won the Perkins Prize for best study of narrative, the Albion prize for best book on Britain after 1800, the Alan Bray Memorial award for best book in queer studies, and a Lambda Literary award for best book in LGBT studies.  With Stephen Best, she edited a 2010 special issue of Representations on “The Way We Read Now”.  This talk comes from her current book project on theatrical celebrity in the nineteenth century.

 


 

The Book History Colloquium at Columbia University, open to any discipline, aims to provide a broad outlet for the scholarly discussion of book history, print culture, the book arts, and bibliographical research, and (ideally) the promotion of research and publication in these fields. Our presenters include Columbia faculty members and advanced graduate students, and scholars of national prominence from a range of institutions.

Questions? Email Karla Nielsen.

Three’s a Charm: “Writing About Coffee, Reading In Cafés: Literature and Coffeehouses in Early Modern France” :03/03/2010

New date! This talk has been rescheduled for March 3, 2010.

The Book History Colloquium at Columbia welcomes Thierry Rigogne from Fordham University’s History Department.  

 

His talk, “Writing About Coffee, Reading In Cafés: Literature and Coffeehouses in Early Modern France” will be held March 3, Butler Library room 523, 6PM.

Well before Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, Parisian cafés have shared a strong affinity with literature. In the seventeenth century, it was books, from travel accounts to medical treatises, that introduced the French to what was then a new, exotic, Oriental beverage. Writers immediately patronized the first coffeehouses, where they could discuss literature and much else, while regular patrons went to cafés to read newspapers or pamphlets. In this talk, Thierry Rigogne will explore the connections between cafés and literature in seventeenth and eighteenth-century France, a time during which they shaped each other’s development and created the figure of the literary café.

The Colloquium is open to all… for our full schedule, see:

Book History Colloquium at Columbia