Tag Archives: Publishing

RBML is hiring a Curator of Literature

bookstore shelves with levitating book

This is not how RBML handles books. Photo by Jaredd Craig on Unsplash

We’re pleased to announce an opening here in Columbia University Libraries’ Rare Book & Manuscript Library for a new Curator of Literature.

The ideal candidate is an accomplished and creative professional with an MLIS or PhD in English, American Literature or related fields.

Primarily, the Curator develops, manages and actively promotes the use of RBML literature collections through programmatic outreach, awareness, public programs and instructional activities.

The Curator is responsible for developing holdings in literature in all formats (e.g., print and archives) through purchase and donation.

Key to the Curator position are archival and/or librarianship skills related to stewarding literature collections that are in place, prioritizing their organization, description, conservation, digitization, and security.

Though very broad in scope, RBML’s Literature collections concentrate around the history of publishing, “obscene” or erotic literature, poetry between the World Wars, the European realist novel, the Beats, African-American literature of the twentieth century, and contemporary poetry, as well as eighteenth-century belles lettres, the novel, fine press and artist books, and twentieth-century small press production.

Columbia University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and strongly encourages individuals of all backgrounds and cultures to consider this position.

Please see the full advertisement for more details, qualifications and how to apply. PDF: Curator of Literature Ad

Event | Roger Chartier on textual mobility

Wednesday, 7 February 2018, 6pm, Room 523 in Butler Library

Moliere's Le Festin de pierre (known as Don Juan)

Le Festin de pierre (known as Don Juan)

On Wednesday, February 7, the RBML and Karla Nielsen, Curator of Literature and Lecturer in English and Comparative Literature, hosts Roger Chartier, Professor in the Collège de France and Annenberg Visiting Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania.

Professor Chartier will use Molière’s play, Le Festin de pierre (known as Don Juan), to model a type of book historical inquiry that focuses on textual mobility.

The talk follows the play from its first attribution to Molière, looping in its first performance and first appearances in print, moves on to early translations, adaptations, and editions of the work, and concludes with the reception of the work by early readers and viewers.

Professor Chartier’s talk will be followed by a Q & A. The event is free and open to the public but registration is recommended.