Decorate Your Laptop | Creating Vinyl Cut Decals

Design Your Laptop LCD Slide - small

Okay, show of hands: who’s ever spent (or thought about spending) a small fortune on unique handmade stickers, buttons, and the like? Or maybe you’ve never given it any real thought — that is, until you glanced at your roommate’s awesome Marvel super heroes laptop decal with envy. Either way, the Science and Engineering Libraries have you covered! We’re offering a “Decorate Your Laptop” workshop, which will provide you with an overview of design principles and instructions on how to operate a vinyl cutter!

This workshop is the result of a partnership between the Science and Engineering Libraries and The Columbia Makerspace; it’s open to all Columbia University affiliates, and no prior software or vinyl cutter experience is needed. Prof. John Kymissis will be demonstrating how to take your project from concept to completion — he’s even bringing laser cutters from the makerspace so that you can cut your masterful designs right on the spot! All you need to bring is a laptop to download open source design software with and your creative energy during the session.

Interested in this, but can’t make it? We’ll post the workshop materials on our past workshops page after it’s over. Would you like to suggest a workshop that we’re not already offering? You can always reach out to us at ref-sci@columbia.edu.

Register here: bit.ly/CUSELworkshop.
We look forward to seeing you there!

 

eResource Spotlight: Royal Society Publishing

Interested in Biology?
Look what we found in our eResource collection…

Featured Paper: Does mixed-species flocking influence how birds respond to a gradient of land-use intensity? in Proceedings of the Royal Society B

Abstract: Conservation biology is increasingly concerned with preserving interactions among species such as mutualisms in landscapes facing anthropogenic change. We investigated how one kind of mutualism, mixed-species bird flocks, influences the way in which birds respond to different habitat types of varying land-use intensity. We use data from a well-replicated, large-scale study in Sri Lanka and the Western Ghats of India, in which flocks were observed inside forest reserves, in ‘buffer zones’ of degraded forest or timber plantations, and in areas of intensive agriculture. We find flocks affected the responses of birds in three ways: (i) species with high propensity to flock were more sensitive to land use; (ii) different flock types, dominated by different flock leaders, varied in their sensitivity to land use and because following species have distinct preferences for leaders, this can have a cascading effect on followers’ habitat selection; and (iii) those forest-interior species that remain outside of forests were found more inside flocks than would be expected by chance, as they may use flocks more in suboptimal habitat. We conclude that designing policies to protect flocks and their leading species may be an effective way to conserve multiple bird species in mixed forest and agricultural landscapes.

This paper and many others are available from The Royal Society Publishing.

Did you know that Columbia University has access to 69,000 Royal Society Publishing journal articles? Start searching within The Royal Society Publishing platform through Columbia University Libraries, you never know what you’ll find!

Have questions regarding electronic resources? Ask your friendly librarians! ref-sci@columbia.edu

Raspberry Pi Workshops at the Library

 

raspberry pi

Hey everyone! As a follow-up to our Arduino Workshops, we’re offering another series that will familiarize you with a popular linux computing system: the Raspberry Pi microcomputer!

Again, this two-part series is open to all Columbia University affiliates, and no prior Raspberry Pi hardware experience is needed. Our first workshop — Python and Pi: Automation to Make Your Life Easier — will get you introduce you to general information about the Raspberry Pi, it’s operating system, and provide examples of real-world projects for inspiration. We’ll also be working through PiCamera exercises, a Python library that integrates with the Raspberry Pi’s connectable camera. No python experience is assumed or required for this workshop. However, the goal isn’t to become an expert at the language or the hardware; instead, focus on trying something you might not have otherwise, connecting with others while learning together, and experimenting with code in a positive environment!

The second workshop — Pi From Scratch: Prototyping Your First Project — is all about finding inspiration and ideas for you next Raspberry Pi project; after all, it’s easier to learn the platform when you’re working on something meaningful. This interactive session will allow you to pair up with participants, brainstorm creative uses for the Pi, and go through the steps of getting a potential project off the ground. We’ll also show you communities and resources that provide help for expanding your knowledge on this subject. Both workshops will take place in the Studio@Butler.

We look forward to seeing you there! You can register for these workshops here: bit.ly/CUSELworkshop.

Raspberry Pi mod. 2” by vvigilante is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

eResource Spotlight: Annual Reviews

Interested in Biochemistry?
Look what we found in our eResource collection…

 
Featured Paper: Genome engineering with targetable nucleases. by Dana Carroll

Abstract:Current technology enables the production of highly specific genome modifications with excellent efficiency and specificity. Key to this capability are targetable DNA cleavage reagents and cellular DNA repair pathways. The break made by these reagents can produce localized sequence changes through inaccurate nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), often leading to gene inactivation. Alternatively, user-provided DNA can be used as a template for repair by homologous recombination (HR), leading to the introduction of desired sequence changes. This review describes three classes of targetable cleavage reagents: zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator–like effector nucleases (TALENs), and CRISPR/Cas RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs). As a group, these reagents have been successfully used to modify genomic sequences in a wide variety of cells and organisms, including humans. This review discusses the properties, advantages, and limitations of each system, as well as the specific considerations required for their use in different biological systems.

This paper and many others are available from Annual Reviews.

Did you know that Columbia University has access to over 1,100 articles from Annual Reviews? Start searching within Annual Reviews through Columbia University Libraries, you never know what you’ll find!

Have questions regarding electronic resources? Ask your friendly librarians! ref-sci@columbia.edu

Columbia + Knovel 2016 Academic Challenge

Knovel Academic Challenge

On February 8th, Columbia launched its first Knovel Academic Challenge giving students the opportunity to solve real-life engineering and science problems.

For two weeks there will be a problem set that utilizes Knovel’s content and interactive tools, participants will be competing for points on an individual level. Search Knovel for help with the contest questions!

Registration is open to all Columbia University students!  Enter weekly for your chance to win grand prizes including an Amazon Gift Card!

Full details available here: http://knovelac.com/

Winning number of points will only be drawn from Columbia students.

 

eResource Spotlight: Knovel

Interested in Mechanical Engineering?
Look what we found in our eResource collection…

Featured eBook: Learning robotics using Python : design, simulate, program, and prototype an interactive autonomous mobile robot from scratch with the help of Python, ROS, and Open-CV! by Joseph Lentin

Summary:Learning Robotics Using Python is an essential guide for creating an autonomous mobile robot using popular robotic software frameworks such as ROS using Python. It also discusses various robot software frameworks and how to go about coding the robot using Python and its framework. It concludes with creating a GUI-based application to control the robot using buttons and slides.

This eBook and many others are available from Knovel.

Did you know that Columbia University has access to over 4,300 eBooks from Knovel? Start searching within Knovel through Columbia University Libraries, you never know what you’ll find!

Have questions regarding electronic resources? Ask your friendly librarians! ref-sci@columbia.edu

Arduino Workshops – Learn how to get started!

 

Arduino

So you’ve probably heard about Arduinos, but have you ever used one? Perhaps, you’ve got one collecting dust in your apartment right this second you’ve just been struggling to figure out what you should do with it. Or, maybe you haven’t, and you’ve got no clue where to start. The best part about these scenarios is that the Science and Engineering Library’s got you covered on both fronts our upcoming Arduino Basics workshops will get you up and running with it in no time!

This two part series is open to all Columbia University affiliates, and no prior Arduino software or hardware experience is needed. Our first workshop Basics: Sensors and Servos will get you started with introductory level information on how the Arduino works, how it reads data from input devices, and how it can be used to create interactive electronics projects. We’ll even cover its C-like programming language, walking you through basic variables, arrays, and loops. This session will be hands on and requires you to bring in a laptop (though, if you’ve got an extra Arduino lying around, please bring that too).

The second workshop Basics: Prototyping Your First Project is all about finding inspiration and ideas for you next big Arduino project; after all, it’s easier to learn the platform when you’re working on something meaningful. This interactive session will allow you to pair up with participants, brainstorm creative uses for the Arduino, and go through the steps of getting a potential project off the ground. We’ll also show you communities and resources that provide help for expanding your knowledge on this subject. Both workshops will take place in the Studio@Butler .

We look forward to seeing you there! You can register for these workshops here: bit.ly/CUSELworkshop.

eResource Spotlight: ICE Virtual Library

Interested in Civil Engineering?
Look what we found in our eResource collection…

Closed-Face Tunnelling Machines and Ground Stability

Featured eBook: Closed-Face Tunnelling Machines and Ground Stability by British Tunnelling Society

Summary:This report is produced in response to a series of incidents of ground instability and collapse that have occurred on recent tunnelling projects in suburban and city centre environments on which closed-face tunnelling machines were used. The purpose of this report is to examine the potential for ground instability or collapse when using closed face tunnelling machines, to investigate the efficacy of various ground investigation techniques in urban areas, and to recommend management and operational guidelines to further minimise the risk when tunnelling beneath highly developed urban areas.

This eBook and many others are available from ICE Publishing on the Ice Virtual Library.

ICE Publishing

Did you know that Columbia University has access to over 1,700 ICE Publishing eBooks? Start searching within ICE Virtual Library through Columbia University Libraries, you never know what you’ll find!

Have questions regarding electronic resources? Ask your friendly librarians! ref-sci@columbia.edu

eResource Spotlight: CRC Press

Interested in our planet?
Look what we found in our eResource collection…

Building Earth Observation Cameras

Featured eBook: Building Earth Observation Cameras by George Joseph

Summary: Building Earth Observation Cameras discusses the science and technology of building an electro-optical imaging system for a space platform from concept to space qualification and in-orbit evaluation. The book provides a broad overview of various Earth imaging systems with specific examples illustrating the design and development issues that impacted the Indian Remote Sensing Satellite (IRS) cameras, and is based on the actual experience of the author, who was intimately involved with the development of cameras for the IRS program.

This eBook and many others are available from CRC Press on the CRCnetBase platform.

CRC Press

Did you know that Columbia University has access to over 7,000 ebooks on CRCnetBase? Start searching within CRCnetBase through Columbia University Libraries, you never know what you’ll find!

Have questions regarding electronic resources? Ask your friendly librarians! ref-sci@columbia.edu

eResource Spotlight: Cambridge University Press eBooks

Interested in Math?
Look what we found in our eResource collection…

Games and Math Book Cover

Featured eBook: Games and Mathematics: Subtle Connections by David Wells

Summary: The appeal of games and puzzles is timeless and universal. In this unique book, David Wells explores the fascinating connections between games and mathematics, proving that mathematics is not just about tedious calculation but imagination, insight and intuition. The first part of the book introduces games, puzzles and mathematical recreations, including knight tours on a chessboard. The second part explains how thinking about playing games can mirror the thinking of a mathematician, using scientific investigation, tactics and strategy, and sharp observation. Finally the author considers game-like features found in a wide range of human behaviours, illuminating the role of mathematics and helping to explain why it exists at all.

This eBook and many others are available from Cambridge University Press.

Cambridge University Press

Did you know that Columbia University has access to over 6,500 ebooks from Cambridge University Press? Start searching within Cambridge Books Online through Columbia University Libraries, you never know what you’ll find!

Have questions regarding electronic resources? Ask your friendly librarians! ref-sci@columbia.edu