Show us your science on Instagram!

SEL_Instagram_April_tb

Every day, scientists and engineers on campus do amazing things. You are doing amazing things. We want to highlight and share the work you do, and we want to offer you some cash* along the way.

Beginning this April, the Digital Science Center is hosting a competition on Instagram for the best science and engineering images from the Columbia community. To enter, post a picture to Instagram, tag @columbiascience, and make sure to use the month’s hashtag theme in the caption/comments field. It’s that easy! You can post/tag as many pictures as you want! Winners will be selected after the end of the month, and then we’ll announce the following month’s theme when we announce the winners.

Take a minute to snap a picture of your amazing research so it can be shared with the entire Columbia research community.

The theme for April is: #experiment – the concept can be applied broadly, so show us whatever ‘experiment’ means to you!

Any questions? Feel free to send us an email at ref-sci@columbia.edu.


*Full terms and conditions are here, and cash will be awarded in the form of $30, $20, and $10 gift cards. All for posting a picture to Instagram.

Workshop: How to Get Your Article Published

Columbia University Libraries Presents:
Behind the scenes at Elsevier:
How to Get Your Article Published

An Author Workshop with Ann Gabriel,
Publishing Director at Elsevier 
Elsevier logo

DATE: Monday April, 7th 2014
TIME: 12:30pm – 2:00pm
LOCATION: Davis Auditorium

Join us on Monday, April 7, and learn how to get your work published. This session will help you understand how the peer review process is critical to getting your work published and will provide a publisher’s perspective on:

  • how to get an article published
  • what happens once you submit the article
  • what makes published articles successful

This is your opportunity to ask all these questions directly to the source!

Register for free at bit.ly/CUSELworkshop

Save the dates for all upcoming library workshops: library.columbia.edu/research/workshops.html

Questions? Please comment on this post and we will get back to you shortly.

Give Your Ideas a 3D Touch

The Digital Science Center at Columbia has a 3D printer.

3D what? Huh? Why? How?
Yes, a 3D printer. That is, you design 3D objects on the computer, using a broad variety of software, from 3D Studio Max and Maya, to Sketchup and AutoCAD, and the printer can bring them to the physical world for you. There are lots of 3D software offered by the DSC both on Macs and PCs (full list here). Furthermore, all of the computers within the DSC are equipped with a 3D mouse meant to enhance your experience and increase productivity.
How it works? Skipping the crazy technical details, think about the following analogy: you are frying a pancake cake. You add a layer of batter in the frying pan and wait until it cooks, then you cook another layer, and another one and so on until you have enough layers to make it look like a cake. Two important things to note are that while 3D printing each layer is printed on top of another and the layers need not have the same shape, which is why you can create much more complex designs than just … cakes. Read more about the process here.
So what now? The Digital Science Center is accepting designs from all students and is going to print the best ones, free of charge. Whether it is a brain model (Fig.1) or a filtration apparatus (Fig.2) you can submit anything! Once submitted, the designs with the most votes will get 3D printed. But there’s more: upload an original model (you must craft them yourself) by December 16, 2013, and be entered to win an Arduino, a quadcopter, or one of three Raspberry Pis! Full contest rules are available here.

Great news: win an iPad Mini!

Help us improve your Libraries! Take the survey today!

 To do list:

  1. Take Libraries survey http://bit.ly/15gBONB
  2. Enter to win iPad Mini*.
  3. Pat self on back for participating, and winning iPad.

* Must be Columbia Univeristy Faculty, Student, or Officer of Research. Must be 18 years or older. Single winner will be notified in October 2013. May enter to win upon survey completion.

ipad mini

Changes to the Libraries’ website and CLIO!

On Monday, June 3rd the Libraries’ will be launching a new version of CLIO and the Libraries website.  For a preview of the new site, see http://preview-library.cul.columbia.edu/.

The new version of CLIO – CLIOBeta - is now available for testing and use via the Libraries homepage, http://cliobeta.columbia.edu/CLIOBeta will become the newest version of CLIO on June 3rd.   CLIObeta has greater flexibility in subject searching, as elements of the record can be searched and combined in a variety of ways.

This is a crucial time for your feedback as we progress through the various stages of our assessment and redesign process. Please let us know what you think of these changes!

Database Trail: BrowZine

BrowZineFrom April 15th to May 15th Columbia University will have trial access to an app that delivers thousands of academic journals to your iPad (Android and iPhone support planned for the future). BrowZine presents journals that the library already subscribes to formatted appropriately for the iPad. Articles accessed through BrowZine may be synced up with Zotero, Dropbox or several other services to help keep all of your information together in one place. BrowZine works with the campus proxy server, giving you access to your favorite journals on your iPad.

Download BrowZine from the App Store on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/browzine/id463787411?mt=8

When initially launching BrowZine, select Columbia University from the drop down list. You will be prompted for your UNI and password to authenticate through the campus proxy server.

To learn more, please take a look at this short video: http://thirdiron.com/browzine-ipad-app/video/ 

Please post any comments you have about this trial service on this blog post, and let us know what you think!

The trial runs through May 15th, 2013.

Science@Columbia

Science@Columbia: Science and Engineering in Social Media (Re-blogged from the EVPR Newsletter)

Jeffrey Lancaster, the Libraries’ Emerging Technologies Coordinator (and GSAS ’11), recently introduced a new platform for shar-ing advances in science and engineering research at the University. Jeffrey launched his Science@Columbia Tumblr blog (columbiascience.tumblr.com) last year as a way for Columbia’s science and engineering faculty, staff and students to share infor-mation about their research within the increasingly socially-connected world. Science@Columbia’s tagline is: “Are you a scientist? Are you at Columbia? Tell me about it”. Through this blog, members of Columbia’s science community can contribute pictures, audio clips, videos, text and other information about their research. Researchers can also spread the word about recent publica-tions and award recipients, and staff can share information about upcoming seminars, networking events and dissertation defenses

…Since its inception in February 2012, the Science@Columbia blog has had more than 600 posts and more than 8,500 page views from 44 states and 77 countries. Other science and engineering bloggers are beginning to visit Jeffrey’s site and re-blog some of his most interesting posts. Most notable were the photos of Ralph Holloway’s physical anthropology lab in Schermerhorn Hall, which have been liked and reblogged more than 100 times during the last 11 months (http://columbiascience.tumblr.com/tagged/physical-anthropology).
For more information about Science@Columbia, please visit http://columbiascience.tumblr.com/

To read the full article see the current EVPR Newsletter

Workshop: How to Get Your Article Published

Columbia University Libraries Presents:
Behind the scenes at Cell Press:
How to Get Your Article Published

An Author Workshop with Boyana Konforti, Editor Cell Reports, Cell Press

DATE: Wednesday April, 17th 2013
TIME: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
LOCATION: Davis Auditorium
Free Pizza Lunch to follow workshop

Identify the most appropriate journal, and understand how the peer review process is critical to getting your work published.
Attend this workshop and learn more about Cell Press editorial system:

  • Steps to take before writing a paper
  • How to develop and submit a manuscript?
  • Elements to consider when composing a manuscript
  • Cell Press criteria for full in-depth review: what the professional editors are looking for?
  • What professional editors ask of reviewers?

This is your chance to ask an editor all those questions you've wanted to ask but been afraid to!
Register for free at: http://goo.gl/QruDz

Event Flyer can be found HERE

Questions? Please comment on this post and we will get back to you shortly.

Exciting changes to the Library’s website and catalog

We wanted to inform you of some changes that will be happening in the coming months to some of our online library tools. Early this summer the library will be launching a new version of CLIO and the Libraries website. 

The new version of CLIO, CLIOBeta - is now available for testing and use via the Libraries homepage at: http://cliobeta.columbia.edu/CLIOBeta will become the newest version of CLIO in early June. The new CLIO uses open source software and is being built locally in cooperation with other research libraries, including Stanford, Virginia and Johns Hopkins. This open source platform will allow us to be more responsive to user feedback.


CLIObeta
 has greater flexibility in subject searching, the new CLIO will also retrieve article content and, in the future, will enable combined searching of the Law Library catalog. Other notable improvements include no limits on the number of records returned and no more time-outs after periods of inactivity. CLIObeta will continue to change in the coming months including the addition of an advanced search. Older versions of CLIO will be available for some time after the June launch of the newly designed CLIO. We will offer more information about CLIO versions in the coming months.

The Library's Website is currently undergoing assessment and a redesign process and will also launch in early June. For a preview of the site, see http://preview-library.cul.columbia.edu/.

This is a crucial time for your feedback as we progress through the various stages of our assessment and redesign process. Please let us know what you think of these changes and we will continue to relay important changes and information to you.

We look forward to hearing from you.

New Database Trial: All The World’s Primates


The Library has a trial for a resource called: All The World’s Primates

All The World’s Primates is a comprehensive resource for researchers, students, and anyone interested in primates. It illustrates the entire diversity of the primate order, covering all of the 413 primate species recognized by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), as well as all of the known subspecies.

  • Many ways to search for primates
  • Detailed data about each taxon are in the tab bar, where you can choose Conservation, Diet, Life History, Behavior, Social System, Habitat, Physical Measurements, or Citations.
  • There are several querying tools available within the Data Mine tab. The first searches all articles, forums and blogs for a search term. The second tool searches the database for primates that meet a given set of criterion.
  • There is an extensive multi-language Glossary if you aren’t familiar with some of the terms used. Present glossaries include English, Japanese, Vietnamese and French. More are expected.

The trial will run through February 16, 2013.

Access via the following link: All The World’s Primates

Please let us know what you think about this resource by leaving a comment on this post.