Author Archives: al3655

Columbia University Libraries Launches Website for the Language and Culture Atlas of Ashkenazic Jewry (LCAAJ)

Columbia University Libraries is very pleased to announce the launch of the website for the digitized data of the Language and Culture Atlas of Ashkenazic Jewry. An accompanying guide to the use of the digitized materials with many supplementary materials is also available.

The LCAAJ archive is an extraordinary resource for research in Yiddish studies that can shed much valuable light on language, ethnography, literature, folklore and music, anthropology, linguistics, Germanic and Slavic studies, and aspects of Central and East European history. The archive consists of over 600 interviews conducted between 1959 and 1972 with native speakers of Yiddish during a long-range comparative study to document the effects of physical, linguistic, and cultural channels and barriers on the geographic fragmentation of the Jewish and diverse non-Jewish populations that coexisted in Central and Eastern Europe before World War II. The LCAAJ project collected its interviews at essentially the last moment, when a diverse body of native speakers was still alive, aiming to address both the challenge of an endangered linguistic and cultural legacy, and the special potential that Yiddish provides for studying language and cultural contact and change.

This two-year project, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, digitized approximately 140,000 pages of interview documents containing data from the interviews, carried out optical character recognition (OCR) and mark-up of the printed responses to enable their content to be searched and manipulated, and made all the digitized content freely available to scholars via the Digital Library Collections at Columbia. Additional work, funded by the Libraries, allowed for complete reprocessing of the full LCAAJ archive for scholarly use. This source for historical, literary, or anthropological research, for the study of languages in contact, and for the evolution and differentiation of language communities, is now available to a worldwide community of scholars.

The written materials accompany more than 5,700 hours of recorded interviews that Columbia Libraries has already digitized through generous support from NEH, private foundations, the New York State Conservation/Preservation Program, and Evidence of Yiddish Documented in European Societies (EYDES, a project of the German Förderverein für Jiddische Sprache und Kultur), through which the audio is publicly available. The long-term goal is to eventually link the written content to the audio recordings of the interviews and make the entire audio and written corpus available to students and scholars in an integrated form.

The interviews contain a wealth of comments about Jewish culture and history from a place and time that is largely out of our reach today. Bringing the LCAAJ archive into the digital environment will exponentially increase its value to historians of Jewish Studies and European history, linguists, anthropologists, and students and teachers of Yiddish. The availability of this data will greatly facilitate the online work of scholars to continue and enhance the important mapping work begun in the first three volumes of the printed Atlas, which were published by Niemeyer in 1992-2000.

As part of the launch of the project, an exhibition called “Yiddish at Columbia” will be mounted in the Chang Octagon Gallery in the Rare Book & Manuscript Library in early March. Additional events will be announced at a later date.

The LCAAJ archive consists of over 600 interviews conducted between 1959 and 1972 with native speakers of Yiddish, documenting the effects of physical, linguistic, and cultural channels and barriers on the geographic fragmentation of the Jewish and diverse non-Jewish populations that coexisted in Central and Eastern Europe before World War II.

Let there be light!

Winnie Xuan Zhu, ’17GSAS, captured the stacks of Lehman Library in a photo she titled “Let There Be Light,”offering her thanks to Lehman staff.

“Recalling the past year, most of the time I spent was in Lehman, which was so unforgettable. [I’d like to] say thanks for all your work and the great environment in Lehman.”

Thanks to Xuan Zhu for her kind words!

Expansion of Borrow Direct Loan Period

We heard you!

The expanded 16-week loan period for materials requested via Borrow Direct begins July 1, 2017.

The new loan period will be 16 weeks – a full semester – with no renewals. This is a change from our current 6-week loan period plus one 6-week renewal.

Thank you for your feedback. You help to make a great service even greater.

Are there other ways for us to improve?  Please be in touch with your concerns, ideas, and questions.

Borrow Direct Staff

307 Butler Library

(212) 854-7535

borrowdirect@columbia.edu

Sit, relax, unwind…

Take a well-deserved break from your hectic schedules! Stop by any of the following libraries for low-key stress relievers like coloring, back and neck rubs, therapy dogs, and more:

Avery Library

Tuesday, May 2 through Thursday, May 11, there will be coloring books and jigsaw puzzles available all day on the 200 level of the library.

Butler Library

Monday, May 1 through Thursday, May 4 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., room 203 will be open as a reflection space, complete with exercise balls and yoga mats, for a moment or two of quiet.

Tuesday, May 2 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Columbia’s Stressbusters will offer free back and neck rubs in room 203.

Thursday, May 4 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Media, Film Studies, & Performing Arts Librarian Nancy Friedland will host a movie night in room 203, showing several animated Looney Tunes shorts and the silent film The General.

Lehman Library

Thursday, May 4 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., Lehman and the School of International and Public Affairs Student Association (SIPASA) will provide coloring supplies and origami.

Science & Engineering Library

Friday, April 28 at 10 a.m., trained therapy dogs will be in the Innovation Space on the main floor, so come in and make a furry friend!

Monday, May 1 through Friday, May 12, there will be coloring books, jigsaw puzzles, and origami available all day in the Innovation Space on the main floor.

Good luck on your exams and take care!

Library Hours on Election Day 2016

Several of our libraries will have shortened hours on Election Day, Tuesday, November 8. Please see below for a schedule of temporary changes to libraries’ hours.

  • Business & Economics Library: CLOSED
  • C.V. Starr East Asian Library: 9am – 7pm
  • Geology Library: 9am – 5pm
  • Health Sciences Library: 9am – 5pm
  • Lehman Social Sciences Library: 9am – 5pm
  • Mathematics Library: 9am – 5pm
  • Music & Arts Library: 9am – 5pm
  • Science & Engineering Library: 9am – 5pm
  • Social Work Library: 10am – 6pm

Any library not listed here will operate as usual. Libraries will return to their regularly scheduled hours on Wednesday, November 9.