Ulysses Kay Online Exhibition

We are delighted to announce that “Ulysses Kay: Twentieth Century Composer” is now available for viewing: https://exhibitions.cul.columbia.edu/exhibits/show/kay Ulysses Kay (1917-1995) wrote more than one hundred forty compositions in a wide range of forms – five operas, over two dozen large orchestral works, more than fifty voice or choral compositions, over twenty chamber works, a ballet, […]

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Loaded Dice

Currently on view in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library is a small but fascinating exhibition of dice, from the Smith Collection of Mathematical  Instruments. They date from the Roman era to the early 20th century. David Eugene Smith (1860-1944) was a professor of mathematics at Teachers College, Columbia University. He used these dice in […]

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Quatercentenary of the House of Romanov

Kempner Gallery February 14th to June 28th, 2013   The exhibition Quatercentenary of the House of Romanov features objects drawn from various collections held by the Bakhmeteff Archive and the Rare Book and Manuscript Library (RBML) at Columbia University. It consists of books, correspondence, original charters, maps, photographs, posters, personal documents, ephemera, and books and […]

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Writing the Word: A Selection of Medieval Latin Biblical Manuscripts in Columbia Collections

Chang Octagon Exhibition Room April 10 to July 5, 2013     This exhibition features codices and fragments from the Rare Book and Manuscript Library and The Burke Library at the Union Theological Seminary, both of the Columbia University Libraries. Spanning the period from the eighth to the fifteenth century, these manuscripts demonstrate the range […]

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Thursday, April 18th– Book History Colloquium: “Translating the Enlightenment: The Publisher as Cultural Intermediary” with Jeffrey Freedman

The last third of the eighteenth century was a period of remarkable creativity in the world of German letters, a period historians associate with such famous authors as Lessing, Kant, and Goethe. At that time, however, German works were practically unknown outside of Germany unless translated into French, the universal language of educated Europeans. This […]

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