THIS THURSDAY, 4pm — Andrea Ritchie, “Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color”

Join Us on Thursday (Sept. 24), from 4-5:30pm, for a conversation with Andrea Ritchie, attorney, author, activist, and Researcher-in-Residence at the Barnard Center for Research on Women, about her book, Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color. Registration for this online event is free and open to the public. […]

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New Date For The Conference “In Service To The New Nation: The Life And Legacy Of John Jay”

The John Jay Papers and Columbia University Library announce the postponement of the conference “In Service to the New Nation: The Life and Legacy of John Jay.” The conference will now be held January 22-23, 2021. Due to the public health risks associated with large gatherings, the conference organizers have opted to hold the event […]

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Eleanor Roosevelt Speaks for Herself: Identifying 1,257 Married Women by their Full Names

It sounds like the setup for a magic trick:  how can an archivist and a public services assistant, both working from home without access to the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, identify 1,257 (!) women previously referred to in our finding aids by their husbands’ names?  Yet it involved no sleight of hand.  We used […]

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Juneteenth, Freedom, and Emancipation Archives in the RBML

  June 19th, known as Juneteenth, has long been a key African American holiday — a day to commemorate emancipation and freedom from enslavement. The date was first celebrated in Texas, in 1865, to mark the end of slavery after the Civil War. In the RBML, archival documents related to African American freedom reflect the […]

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Perhaps you need some amusement

  Just in time for the weekend, a little passive entertainment while you are waiting for your bread dough to rise. For an easy thrill, page through the glorious Page Chromatic Type Specimen, always the big hit when type design classes visit. Better in person (it’s so BIG — some 18 inches tall), but still […]

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