Category Archives: MA Students

Bloomberg Terminal Training. Sign up now!

In the library we get asked all year round when training sessions for Bloomberg Terminal’s are. The answer is always at the beginning of the year.  This year, they are so popular, they have added extra sessions!  Please see the dates and times below.  Be sure to follow the link at the end to register.  Trust me, this is one training session you do not want to miss!

Bloomberg Introductory Training.  The dates for the sessions are as follows:

  • Friday, October 7th @ 10 am
  • Friday, October 21st @ 10 am
  • Friday, November 4th @ 10 am
  • Friday, November 18th @ 10 am

All sessions will be held at the Business Library.

RSVP @  https://goo.gl/forms/F6W0mlblriyxXNcO2

As an FYI, the form will automatically notify the business global and generate a confirmation email for the patron.

Lastly, if any of theses times do not work for the patron he/she can request an individual consult via business@library.columbia.edu

DIY Research Series – Get the most out of your research!

Though we know your time here at the J-School is short and packed, these  workshops are something that you can work into your schedule to help you while you are here at Columbia and beyond!  Check them out and sign up for the ones you can.  We want to make sure you have all the tools you need to be successful!

DIY Research Series from the Libraries
Build skills on how to design and conduct your own research studies!
All workshops are held in Lehman Social Sciences Library, Group Study 2, 12:30-1:30pm
October 4
Basics of Study Design
Learn how to translate a research question into a research study. Find documentation on how to conduct different kinds of research analysis, and get up to speed quickly with different methods to aid you in your research.
 
October 11
Using Free and Open Data
Discover free and open data – from government agencies and other organizations – that you can use in your research immediately to do analysis and visualizations. Open data portals, data scraping, FOIA requests, and open data issues will be discussed.
 
October 18
Ethnography & Observation Studies
Understand how to collect data on individual/group activities and social interactions through ethnographic fieldwork and participant-observation. Methodological strengths, limitations, and documenting fieldnotes will be discussed.
 
October 25
Survey & Interview Studies
Understand how to collect data using surveys and interviews. Sampling, question development, and implementation will be covered. Doing sensitive research and working with vulnerable groups will also be discussed.

Map Club, learn how to make amazing maps!

Join us for Map Club! A series of fast-paced hack sessions geared towards the rapid acquisition of skills in geospatial technology. 

Led by DSSC Spatial Research Intern, Emily Fuhrman, each session provides an informal and fun opportunity for the exploration of a web-based library or framework. Sessions will be loosely divided into three phases: background and setup, self-paced making, and sharing.

These sessions will be held in Room 215 on the lower level of Lehman Library. Please bring your own laptop. Participants should have basic facility with JavaScript.

RSVP through the library workshop page, and for any questions, please feel free to contact (dssc@library.columbia.edu)

09/23, 1:00 – 3:00PM → Dynamic Mapping with Cartagen

This session focuses on Cartagen, a vector-based framework for rendering maps in HTML5.

09/30, 1:00 – 3:00PM → Simple Maps with geojson.io

This session focuses on geojson.io, a simple, open-source editor for map data.

10/07, 1:00 – 3:00PM → WORKSHOP — Interactive maps with CARTO

This guided session explores CARTO, a unified web mapping and visualization engine.

10/14, 1:00 – 3:00PM → Interactive Mapping with Mapzen

This session focuses on Mapzen, an open, sustainable, and accessible mapping platform.

10/28, 1:00 – 3:00PM → Dynamic Mapping with OpenLayers

This session focuses on OpenLayers, a high-performance library for rendering geographic information in web pages.

11/04, 1:00 – 3:00PM → WORKSHOP — Introduction to QGIS

This guided session explores QGIS, a free and open source geographic information system that offers powerful tools for data editing, viewing, and analysis.

11/11, 1:00 – 3:00PM → Generating Cartograms with CartoGrid

This session focuses on CartoGrid, a grid-based cartogram generator.

11/18, 1:00 – 3:00PM → Geospatial Analysis with Turf.js

This session focuses on Turf.js, a tool for in-browser geospatial analysis.

12/02, 1:00 – 3:00PM → WORKSHOP — D3.js

This guided session explores the geovisualization capabilities of D3.js, a JavaScript library for manipulating documents based on data.

Hope to see you there!

Reading Bias discussion series Fall 2016

Are you interested in the types of bias that exist in society? Then this group is for you! Hosted by our libraries this semester the Reading Bias group will consist of interactive discussions that explore biases, assumptions, and worldviews inherent in society via texts, e.g. articles, archives, data, and code. Readings are shared in advance to help facilitate discussions.Critical Reading Workshop_Version2
The Reading Bias discussion topics for the Fall semester are –
  • The American Dream (9/29, 6pmJournalism Library)
  • Library Collections and Archives (11/2, 6pm, Location TBD)
  • Big Data and Code (TBD)
The first discussion is on Sept. 29, 6pm in the Journalism Library.
Please register here: http://bit.ly/rbregistration
Readings are here: http://bit.ly/rbreadings
We hope you will join us!

Master’s Projects & Theses: Tips & Tools for Your Winter Break!

Over the winter break, no doubt most of you will be hard at work on the first draft of your master’s projects and theses! Here are some ways to get help before your draft is due, along with some helpful resources and strategies for getting that draft done.

Where to get help:

Nott Terrace High School journalism students at copy desk of the Terrace Tribune. Schenectady, New York (collection, Library of Congress).

  • Lehman Library hours: Open December 24th, 29th, 30th, & 31st from 9am to 5pm; (directions)
    • Closed December 20th through December 28th.
    • Closed January 1st through January 4th.
  • Contact information for librarians, arranged by subject expertise.
  • For journalism help: email journalism@library.columbia.edu (While Starr’s away for the holidays, her colleagues will answer this email address. Starr monitors it while she’s in town.)
  • For help after 5pm or on weekends: use our Ask A Librarian service.

Writing and editing resources:

Project/Thesis tips and strategies:

Peg Boyle Single has some great tips on writing theses and dissertations, much of which is applicable to your project. She also wrote a great (and really short!) book on this topic.
How to Write a Lot by Paul Silvia; this book is geared toward academic writing, but it’s suitable for all kinds of writing, and how to make a habit of it. Best of all, this book is super-short at just 149 pages!
This Gradhacker article has a lot of great tips, primarily geared toward getting yourself in the right mental space to get the work done. The main take-aways:
  • You are not alone—all your classmates (and those before you) have faced feelings of anxiety, failure, and inability related to this project. You may feel like you’re the only one struggling, but all of us who have trudged the halls of graduate school have faced similar feelings. Reach out for the support of your classmates—they probably need to vent their frustration, too.
  • Work in small increments, like half an hour. Even a little progress is something. Facing the seemingly insurmountable goal of writing your entire project can seem daunting, but you get it done by just breaking it down into tiny pieces.
  • Don’t strive for perfection, strive for DONE.
This blog post on outlining shows a great way to break your project up into chunks. Outlines are key to breaking your project into small, digestable pieces, and for keeping you on track.
A focus statement can be helpful: write a one- or two-sentence summary of your project. Write or print it on a notecard or small piece of paper, and keep it in front of you while you work. Look up at it every once in a while, and use it to keep yourself on track. Often, while working on a story or research, your mind will take off on wild tangents—having your focus statement in front of you can help you maximize your time by keeping you focused.

Winter Break: Some Project and Thesis Tips!

Over the winter break, no doubt most of you will be hard at work on the first draft of your master’s projects and theses! Here are some ways to get help before your draft is due, along with some helpful resources and strategies for getting that draft done.

Where to get help:

Writing and editing resources:

Project/Thesis tips and strategies:

Peg Boyle Single has some great tips on writing theses and dissertations, much of which is applicable to your project. She also wrote a great (and really short!) book on this topic. 
 
How to Write a Lot by Paul Silvia; this book is geared toward academic writing, but it’s suitable for all kinds of writing, and how to make a habit of it. Best of all, this book is super-short at just 149 pages! 
 
This Gradhacker article has a lot of great tips, primarily geared toward getting yourself in the right mental space to get the work done. The main take-aways:
  • You are not alone—all your classmates (and those before you) have faced feelings of anxiety, failure, and inability related to this project. You may feel like you’re the only one struggling, but all of us who have trudged the halls of graduate school have faced similar feelings. Reach out for the support of your classmates—they probably need to vent their frustration, too.
  • Work in small increments, like half an hour. Even a little progress is something. Facing the seemingly insurmountable goal of writing your entire project can seem daunting, but you get it done by just breaking it down into tiny pieces.
  • Don’t strive for perfection, strive for DONE.
This blog post on outlining shows a great way to break your project up into chunks. Outlines are key to breaking your project into small, digestable pieces, and for keeping you on track.
 
A focus statement can be helpful: write a one- or two-sentence summary of your project. Write or print it on a notecard or small piece of paper, and keep it in front of you while you work. Look up at it every once in a while, and use it to keep yourself on track. Often, while working on a story or research, your mind will take off on wild tangents—having your focus statement in front of you can help you maximize your time by keeping you focused.

Viewing Past Master’s Projects & Theses

Master's projects/theses from past students are viewable in print at the Journalism Library and Lehman Library. Here's a guide to their location, based on year of completion.

type year location
MS projects 2011-2013 Journalism Library
MS projects 2010 and earlier (back to 1957) Lehman Library (International Affairs Building)
MA theses 2010-2013 Journalism Library
MA theses 2009 and earlier Lehman Library (International Affairs Building)

 

To find specific titles or authors, use our Master's Projects and Theses Index. Unfortunately, there is currently no subject access or keyword search for this collection. The print MS projects and MA theses cannot be checked out, but they can be read in the library. The most recent five years of broadcast Master's projects and theses are available for loan from the Journalism Library Reserves Collection and circulate for 2 days. Projects from earlier years may be requested at the Lehman Library Reserves Desk. To request a radio or television project, you must know the author's name and their year of graduation, available through the index.

 

Let us know if you have any questions about using the collection, and best of luck with your own projects!

1000 Twitter Followers – Time to Celebrate!

A little birdie told us we now have 1,000 followers! 

@JournalismLib is grateful to all followers for enabling us to reach this milestone.  We will be randomly selecting 5 of our current followers for $5 Amazon gift cards as a token of our appreciation.  We wouldn't be here without all of you! 

And if you're not yet following us, join us now!  Still time to win – random drawing will happen Friday, May 24th, at 7pm.