Author Archives: Teresa Harris

Hoppner, Beechey, Fisher, Lavery: Researching Columbia’s Portraits.

February 11 – May 10, 2019
Monday – Friday, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Wallach Study Center for Art & Architecture, Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library

John Hoppner, Portrait of Isabella Ricketts, later Mrs. Stanlake Henry Batson (1782-1845), ca. 1800-01, oil on canvas, 39 1/2 x 30 in. (100.2 x 76.2 cm), Art Properties, Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, Gift of Loyd H. Langston (C00.762).

Now on view in Avery Library is the exhibition Hoppner, Beechey, Fisher, Lavery: Researching Columbia’s Portraits, curated by Roberto C. Ferrari, Curator of Art Properties, with Mateusz Mayer, Ph.D. student, Department of Art History & Archaeology. This focused exhibition showcases four rarely-seen historical British portraits from the University art collection, painted by these artists between the years 1800 and 1927. The show highlights new discoveries made about each painting, ranging from biography to provenance to political propaganda, but also proposes to question what “British” means both historically and in the age of Brexit.

The Columbia University art collection, stewarded by Art Properties and based in Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, includes nearly 1,000 portrait paintings, as well as hundreds of portrait busts, photographs, and prints. This exhibition encourages students, faculty, and researchers to reconsider the world of portraiture and to encourage the use of the entire University art collection for curricular and educational programs, where new discoveries can be made every day.

 

Celebrating the publication of New York Rising

New York Rising : An Illustrated History from the Durst Collection
The Monacelli Press, 2018
Published in association with The Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation and Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University

From the first European settlement in the seventeenth century through the skyscrapers and large-scale urban planning schemes of the late twentieth century, this book presents a broad historical survey, illustrated with images drawn largely from the rich archival resources of the Durst Collection at Avery Library. Authors Kate Ascher and Thomas Mellins with ten contributing scholars — the late Hilary Ballon, Ann Buttenwieser, Andrew Dolkart, David King, Reinhold Martin, Richard Plunz, Lynne B. Sagalyn, Hilary Sample, Russell Shorto, and Carol Willis — delved into the collection assisted by Chris Sala (Avery Architecture Librarian and Durst Collection curator) to select objects that reflect their own areas of interest and expertise.

Book reviews:
https://www.6sqft.com/the-durst-collection-shows-new-york-rising-from-the-17th-century-to-the-skyscraper-age/

https://www.brickunderground.com/live/new-york-rising-durst-collection-book-review

Kate Ascher and Tom Mellins interviewed by George Bodarky on “Cityscape.”
http://www.wfuv.org/content/new-york-rising-17th-century-skyscraper-age

Transportation Alternatives

New York City as it will be in 1999: a pictorial forecast of the city, 1900. (AA735 N4 N422)

 

TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES

Curator: Lena Newman, Special Collections Librarian

November 9, 2018 – February 8, 2019
Monday – Friday9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Avery Classics Reading Room, Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library

In April 2019, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority will shut down the Canarsie Tunnel, a vital underground link that carries L-train riders between Manhattan and Brooklyn, for much-needed repairs. As New Yorkers know all too well, the problems plaguing the city’s transportation infrastructure extend far beyond a single subway line. Express bus lanes, Citi bikes, pedestrian plazas, the constant debate around congestion pricing for cars – all these are attempts made by the city to deal with an aging and increasingly inadequate transportation system. But the challenge of moving people in to, out of and around the city isn’t a new one. The objects in this exhibit seek to illustrate various transportation solutions – from the never realized to the barely still working – throughout New York’s history.